GlobalAir.com - Page 59 Aviation Articles

GlobalAir.com and Eagle Aviation present a charity aviation poker run

 

 

On June 26, we will have pilots fly out of Bowman Field (LOU) to several nearby airports in a poker run to raise money for the WHAS Crusade for Children. It's a great cause, and we wholeheartedly encourage everyone in the area to fly in and help out. St. Louis? Indy? Nashville? No distance is too far as long you have enough av-gas.

 

Full details and registration can be found here: https://www.globalair.com/pokerrun/

 

And, as promised in the tease, here is a random link to a waterpark being constructed in Oregon that features a 747 as a centerpiece.

Yeah, it's neat; it's different...

But don't forget to click the Poker Run link, too!   Thanks.

Morning Rundown: More EBACE coverage and a note for AirVenture planning

As it will continue to be for much of the week and beyond, EBACE still grabs headlines today among industry publications and elsewhere.

AIN posted two stories in the wee hours (at least it was for those of us still stateside). Ian Sheppard grabs quotes from a European Parliament member, as well as the respective leaders of the NBAA and EBAA -- all noting the importance of the bizav industry. Perhaps the most interesting quote, though, comes from Teal Group executive Richard Aboulafia, who says the number of used jets on the market last year was a "false reflection of reality" as businesses warded pressure from shareholders and the public. Read more here.  

In the other AIN article, Jennifer Harrington-Snell writes that growth in Asia is sparking the bizav market recovery. Furthermore, as nations continue to develop, says Jetcraft Corporation part owner Jahid Fazal-Karim, "No one should ignore Africa."

As posted yesterday, EBAN has a full list of the releases companies are putting out at EBACE.

The benchmark of summer general aviation gatherings, AirVenture, kicks off again in July. Of course, it’s never too early to issue a NOTAM.  This one is thick enough to receive consideration for a Nobel Prize in literature. Download the PDF now if you plan to fly to Oshkosh. For those who have never been, look it over to get a better idea of what the event is like.

Finally, here are a couple of opinion pieces. David Collogan writes at Aviation Week, slamming what has been a drawn-out process of finding a TSA chief. He makes good points of what could happen with a biz-jet security breach without a knowledgeable (and accountable) person in charge.

And Jon Anne Doty writes for our friends at PlaneConverstations.com that it is easier to spend someone else's money -- whether it's a teen pleading from Mom and Dad, or an airline pleading from taxpayers.

Check back for more throughout the day.

NTSB makes conclusions on Hudson River miracle

 

The National Transportation Safety Board today issued a list of conclusions on last year's 'Miracle on the Hudson' when a U.S. Airways A-320 departed New York LaGuardia (LGA) for Charlotte, N.C. (CLT) and struck a flock of birds and landed without fatality in the frigid January waters.

The report says much more than merely concluding 'Sully=Good, Geese=Bad,' noting the almost-perfect sequence of events that saved a jetliner full of lives that day.

Read the complete list of conclusions here and the NTSB press release here.

Series of local incidents and crashes leave us puzzled, saddened

The truth is simpler than the numbers themselves: Flying is overwhelmingly safe.

Me, you, or anyone, is more likely to be killed behind the wheel of a car or walking across a busy street than we are in an airplane. Aircraft incidents are so rare, yet unfortunately so tragic, that when they happen they make major news.

Strangely, and in Sunday's case sadly, a recent rash of mishaps and crashes have burdened our community of Louisville, Ky., with more than its share of bad luck.

Nearly a month ago, a Michigan man reportedly ran out of fuel and crashed just outside of the airport fence on approach to Louisville International (SDF). He was hospitalized with minor injuries, but local media seemed more concerned with guns and ammunition found in the aircraft. He was flying here for a gun show.

A second incident at the same airport a week later involved a UPS cargo jet and a faulty computer warning. In this case, an emergency was declared; the pilot landed safely, and the plane was cleared again for takeoff later that night.

Then the bad winds shifted to nearby Bowman Field (LOU), where GlobalAir.com is located.

As warbirds and stunt aircraft arrived for the Thunder Over Louisville airshow, landing gear failed on a Strikemaster, shutting down a runway for much of the afternoon but causing no casualties.

This area has seen much more than its share of incidents in recent weeks. Sadly, not all of them saw its participants walk away.

A Piper Malibu en route to Bowman crashed Sunday night in southern Indiana, killing a Colorado couple.

No cause has been determined, but the night was cloudy with storms in the area. Witnesses reported hearing the engine sputter before impact. So far, it has been a tough year for fatalities in the two-state region that we locals refer to as Kentuckiana.

Media reports say six people died in regional crashes since the New Year. These incidents come in addtion to two other minor runway mishaps here at Bowman last week, only one of which even appeared to warrant an FAA report. Sometimes all the little things seem to add up to something slightly larger if you spend enough time somewhere to see enough happen.

It's almost second nature for a journalist to see something take place more than twice then lump it all together as a trend, but the only two shared traits of any of these cases are relative location and the involvement of aircraft. From weather to equipment or pilot error, a simple lapse can lead to a grave mistake in aviation.

Here is to seeing a great deal less of them in our neck of the woods.  

 

Morning Rundown: EBACE and WestJet Quarterly Profits

EBACE continues to be the focus of the business aviation world this week, and within it that focus continues to be the beaten-up, yet-recovering economy. Of the largest media organizations covering the trade show in Geneva, two focused on the recovery among bizav groups, though with differing headlines.

A piece in The New York Times leads by discussing whether the Icelandic volcano could have threatened EBACE altogether under the headling Forecast for Business Jets: Slow Climb.

On a somewhat different side of the coin, UK wire service Reuters reports from EBACE that optimism among participants is high and notes that business aviation is recovering more quickly than its commercial cohorts in a article entitled Business aviation recovering fast - Eurocontrol.

Aviation Week's Benet Wilson showcases static displays from EBACE, including offerings from Boeing, Bombardier and Dassault. As the first day of EBACE wraps up, we expect an update from longtime GlobalAir.com contributor Jeremy Cox of JetBrokers, Inc. His complete gallery of posts for our site can found here.

UPDATE: European Business Air News (EBAN) has this link for all press releases coming from EBACE.

One final tidbit this morning, Canada's WestJet released its first quarter earnings this morning, showing an impressive 20th consecutive quarter of finishing in the black ink. However, the 2010 numbers are down somewhat from its 2009 counterpart. The release does not go into Volcano-Gate or any other drawn-out explanation or analysis of the figures, other than to note a compensation package for an outgoing executive and increased fuel costs.

Cox recently posted a breakdown of the first quarter market in used business jets on his blog. Check it out here.

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