GlobalAir.com - Page 10 Aviation Articles

We Have a Winner for Airventure 2013 Drawing!

GlobalAir would like to extend our thanks to everyone that stopped by our booth last week at EAA AirVenture! Our new Mobile ARC (Airport Resource Center) was VERY well received, and we made many new friends (as one always does in Oshkosh)! You can check it out from your mobile device right now!

We would also like to extend a congratulations to Jim Corbin from Winona, MS – he was the lucky winner in our drawing for a $100 gift certificate to Aircraft Tool Supply. His name was drawn from over 450 entries!

Jim brought his daughter to the show for a few days, flying in his 1953 Pacer, and had a wonderful adventure. Congratulations, Jim!

Jetcraft Corporation Introduces HUD Vision Access™ – Based on Kollsman Technology – for Bombardier Challenger 604

FAA STC approval and US dealer network established – sales and installation now available through West Star Aviation

RALEIGH, NC, July 23, 2013 – Jetcraft Corporation and its subsidiary Jetcraft Avionics LLC, today announced that their HUD Vision Access™ system is now available for sale and installation on the Bombardier Challenger 604 (CL604).

Last month, Kollsman announced that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had awarded a “lower landing credit” approved supplemental type certificate (STC) for the Kollsman enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) for the CL604. As a major Kollsman EFVS distributor to the business aviation aftermarket, Jetcraft has commercialized this offering and branded it as HUD Vision Access.

Fully integrated with existing avionics, HUD Vision Access makes the CL604 a more flexible and valuable aircraft by allowing pilots to safely taxi, take-off and land in total darkness, fog, rain, snow, smog and other reduced visibility conditions. Under FAR 91.175, HUD Vision Access permits pilots to descend below decision height (DH/DA) at most airports, reducing the need for ground-based infrastructure. For owners and operators of CL604s, the principal benefits include additional operational credit at more than 4,000 runways across the country, during straight-in approaches with ILS or WAAS-LPV.

Implementation of the HUD Vision Access is a value-adding retrofit for CL604s in-line with the FAA’s new ‘NextGen’ initiative, which places increasing importance on cockpit-based (vs. ground-based) guidance systems.

West Star Aviation, a leading US provider of maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services with multiple authorized locations, has been selected by Jetcraft for system installations. West Star will sell and install HUD Vision Access as an integrated system, provisions or as separate components.

“Jetcraft’s HUD Vision Access system makes the CL604 a more valuable aircraft,” says Chad Anderson, President, Jetcraft Corporation. “Based on our extensive experience in the remarketing of previously-owned business aircraft and independent analysis, we estimate the resale value of HUD Vision Access to be approximately 70% of new. Additionally, HUD Vision Access is a significant differentiator at resale, compared to a similar aircraft without this upgrade. Previously, EFVS was only available on new aircraft sold directly by OEMs. With HUD Vision Access now STC approved on the CL604, we look forward to continuing to work with the Kollsman team to pursue EASA approval and comparable retrofits for aftermarket Bombardier Challenger 605 and CRJ conversion fleets. Working with West Star Aviation to access this game-changing technology enables clients to derive more value from their aircraft investments,” adds Mr. Anderson.

“We are pleased to be the leading installation facilities of Jetcraft’s HUD Vision Access system for CL604s,” continues Greg Byrnes, Senior Vice President, West Star Aviation. “We have considerable expertise with Challengers, specifically including avionics installations. The HUD Vision Access represents a major value-add for aircraft owners and operators. With recent FAA STC approval now established, we are ready to serve the more than 150 CL604 operators registered in the US,” concludes Mr. Byrnes.

About Jetcraft Corporation

Jetcraft Corporation is an international leader in new and pre-owned business aircraft sales, acquisitions and trades. Headquartered in Raleigh, NC, Jetcraft has sales offices/representation in five US cities; Basel and Zurich, Switzerland; Dubai, UAE, Moscow, Russia and Hong Kong, China. The company’s 50-year-plus track record in aircraft transactions has earned it a world class customer base and one of the strongest global networks in the industry. Jetcraft Avionics LLC, a subsidiary of Jetcraft Corporation, provides distribution of enhanced flight vision systems (EFVS) for aftermarket business aircraft using Kollsman’s state-of-the-art EVS-II and AT-HUD. For more information, please visit www.jetcraft.com.

About West Star Aviation

West Star Aviation, Inc. specializes in airframe repair and maintenance, engine repair and maintenance, major modifications, avionics installation and repair, interior refurbishment, paint, parts, surplus avionics sales, window repair, landing gear overhauls and accessory services. The company also provides complete FBO services for transient aircraft at its East Alton, Illinois and Grand Junction, Colorado facilities. For more information, please visit www.weststaraviation.com.

The Next Generation MD-10 ORBIS Flying Eye Hospital

According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are visually impaired. Of that number 80% of these impairments can be avoided or cured – however, 90% of those afflicted live in developing countries where receiving that care is difficult or almost impossible.

This is where ORBIS International comes in.

ORBIS International is a nonprofit organization that works in developing countries to save sight. ORBIS prevents and treats blindness through hands-on training, public health education, improved access to quality eye care, advocacy and partnerships with local health care organizations. In 1982, its unique aircraft, the Flying Eye Hospital, took to the skies. For the first time ever, a fully-equipped, state-of-the-art teaching hospital had been installed inside an airplane.

Since then, the Flying Eye Hospital has carried out hospital based programs in 92 countries, and has established a long-term presence in the following countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal, Vietnam, Cameroon, Ethiopia, South Africa, Zambia, Peru and Haiti. ORBIS has also used the Flying Eye Hospital and local hospital partners to train 325,000 ophthalmologists, nurses, biomedical engineers and other health care workers to carry out their work, plus has developed an active pool of over 400 doctors, nurses and other eye care specialists from around the world who volunteer to teach during one- to two-week sight-saving programs.

ORBIS medical faculty also train local doctors in oculoplastic surgery, which includes repair of the eye socket (orbit), eyelids, and tear production and drainage. Oculoplastic surgery may be performed to preserve sight as well as to enhance appearance.

Conditions that commonly require oculoplastic surgery in developing countries include:

* Drooping upper eyelid (ptosis)

* Scarring of the upper eyelid, caused by (trachoma, age or trauma, which prevents the lid from covering the entire eye

* Blocked tear ducts

* Trauma causing a fracture to the bones surrounding the eye (socket/orbit)

* Tumors within the orbit, eye or tear gland or pressing against the eye (orbital tumor)

Oculoplastic surgery includes placement of an artificial eye (prosthesis) when eye removal is necessary. Oculoplastic surgical skills are in extremely short supply in developing countries.

ORBIS FEH Comparison – DC-10 vs. MD-10

Recently, FedEx has donated an MD-10 cargo aircraft which will replace the DC-10 that has been serving them well (and still will during the transition). The MD-10 will be converted into the next generation, state of the art Flying Eye Hospital. With the MD-10, ORBIS will only need two pilots as opposed to the current three, as the need for a flight engineer is eliminated. Transitioning to the MD-10 also increases the availability of FedEx pilots to fly FEH programs. The MD-10 has better range, expending from 4,000 to 6,000 miles before a need to refuel. Finally, because they are converting a freighter to a hospital, they will be able to configure the hospital using modules as opposed to building it into the airframe – much more cost-effective and requiring less certification to operate as a flying hospital.

To learn more about ORBIS, including how to donate your time or resources to the cause, please visit www.ORBIS.org. And you can learn more about McDonnell Douglas commercial aircraft on the market at GlobalAir.com as well.

 

 

 

The Future of Aviation in the U.S.

By: Brent Owens
Owner/Publisher: iflyblog.com

future of aviationWhen the group was deciding on a theme for this month’s Blogging in Formation series (#blogformation), we agreed to anchor it around July 4th (U.S. Independence Day). We settled on The Future of Aviation in the U.S., but we encouraged each other to explore the edges, good or bad, as we saw fit.

We Are The Future of Aviation In The United States

 
Aviation in the U.S. is at an interesting crossroads. We have enjoyed large populations of pilots and a commensurate number of airplanes through the bulk of the last century. Now with Baby Boomers aging and economies melting, the population of aviators has reached historically low levels. Couple that with the cost to fly at unprecedentedly high levels, things aren’t looking good. Also, we have more regulation, more oversight, more scrutiny, and our safety record, although good, is not good enough in the eyes of regulators. Combine all this with our modern distractions and it is very tough to recruit young men and women into our ranks, especially as a career. Flying for fun, or for a living, in the U.S. has proved to be a very difficult proposition in recent decades.

So with all this as the backdrop you would think that aviation here has gone the way of CB radios or Disco, but you’d be wrong. The group that has remained in this new era is more vibrate, engaged, and resourceful than ever. If you have been to Oshkosh, you know what I mean. It is truly amazing to be in the presence of such an awesome group of dedicated people.

The passion from those of us left is infectious. We are constantly looking for alternative ways to continue to do what we love and spread the gospel of flying. The organizations that represent us, are as strong as ever and are working hard to make sure we don’t give up any more of our freedoms to bureaucracy and security theatre.

Since we are in the eve of Independence Day in the United States, it is more than appropriate to celebrate our successes and put behind us our losses. Looking forward is the only way to get where we want to be in the future. It is incumbent on us to be leaders in our small family and do our part to light the way for future generations.

In a related article I wrote about how the EAA is working on a program to bridge the gap between Young Eagles prospects and future pilots (to be announced at Oshkosh 2013). This endeavor, will tap into a great deal of grassroots energy and it is bound to succeed. With it, we may come away with our own version of a “pilot boom” that hasn’t been seen since the Baby Boomers took up wings.

New pilot starts is really an important concept, because this is what will fuel the industry into the future. If we don’t have this, our ranks will keep dwindling away and soon we will have no voice to counter opposition and no economy of scale. If that occurs it’s only a matter of time before flying will be completely inaccessible to the average American. Several organizations have recognized this decades ago and started working on plans to stave off the bleeding, but it hasn’t been enough. Our current economic climate hasn’t helped either.

My plan is to do my part to support all these new (and old) efforts, because I know the greater good is the end goal. That also means; giving rides to people who are interested in flying; getting involved in local and national organizations that support us; writing my politician when our freedoms are under attack; volunteering at events; flying for charity, if possible; speaking at functions about aviation; (add your ideas here). See related article here.

We all have a choice to make, fly and be free or accept a fate of mediocrity. WE are the future of aviation in the United States and with that comes an awesome responsibility. What are your intentions?

Reconfiguring Your Cabin-Things You May Not Think About

Keeping Downtime to a Minimum
Tony Morris of Elliott Aviation, Interior Shop Manager
www.elliottaviation.com

Many times when older aircraft change hands or have original interiors, a cabin reconfiguration is desired, such as adding a divan, a cabinet or changing the club seating arrangement. When considering a cabin reconfiguration, communication with your interior refurbishment facility on the front end of the project is key. By communicating your needs and wants with your interior facility ahead of time, the facility you choose will be able to tell you what options you have, an accurate aircraft downtime and what those options will cost.

Any time you make a modification to the interior of an aircraft, consideration has to go into more than aesthetics and comfort level. For instance, every time you move cabin seating, you need to consider not only the seat itself, but the seat track location and the oxygen box locations and egress for emergency exits. Reconfiguring your seating arrangement might require a headliner modification to accommodate more oxygen masks. If you are removing a cabinet to accommodate more seating, you again need to have access to oxygen masks, requiring a modification to the headliner. Items like air gaspers and reading lights need to be considered.

Structurally, modifications to the aircraft might also include power, drainage and adding support when you are installing a cabinet over a location that used to house a seat. Switching out window shades might also require structural modifications to the aircraft. Also, keep in mind that if you want something that is not a factory approved layout or an STC approval has not been previously acquired for your aircraft, the development and approval of an STC may be required meaning additional cost and downtime. Keep in mind not all configurations may receive approval so advanced notice is critical.

If your cabin happens to have 16G seats like CJs, XLS, Citation X and others, these seats have to be built to STC standard which includes fire blocking and other requirements. Because of additional guidelines, 16G seat rebuilds alone typically require an additional two to three weeks of downtime. Plating is another factor that can affect your downtime. There is a misconception that plating can be polished but in reality can only be cleaned. Pitted or corroded plating cannot be polished or cleaned. It needs to be replaced. Plating is typically sent out but can be worked in parallel to the rest of the project, so knowing what you want early should not affect the downtime.

Some hand-tufted carpets can also affect your downtime as many higher-end carpets are made to order and could take up to 12 weeks to arrive. Again, this will have minimal if any effect on your downtime if chosen early.



Tony Morris began working on aircraft in 1985 as an Aircraft Exterior Paint Stripper at Byerly Aviation in Pekin, IL. In 1988, he started installing aircraft interiors at Aero Services. Tony joined Elliott Aviation in 2001 as a cabinet maker and became the cabinet shop lead in 2005. He was promoted to Interior Supervisor in 2007 and then to Interior Manager in 2011.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

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