GlobalAir.com - Page 55 Aviation Articles

Aviation News Rundown: Beware of future airline pilots? and Learn to Fly Day (maybe one can fix the other)

A panel of experts at an aviation safety forum this week issued a scary scenario for the sky in future commercial aviation. They told the NTSB that future pilots at airlines could be, in general, less experienced and ethical amidst an industry in which the workers will be in high demand as airlines begin hiring again.

The Associated Press reports in its coverage of the forum that the hardest hit will be regional airlines, which employ pilots with less experience at lower salaries. Fewer college students and military pilots are looking for work at airlines, as 42,000 pilots will need to be hired over the next 10 years. Flights will still need to be made, and some fear that this could compromise qualifications.

In other news, the FAA says widespread NexGen upgrades will come a little more quickly than initially anticipated. Quoted in the Dallas Morning News, Federal Aviation Administrator Randy Babbitt told the American Association of Airport Executives that the bulk of improvements will have occurred by 2016 rather than the forecasted 2018, as airlines rush to be competitive with advanced gear as the transition snowballs.

The first-ever International Learn to Fly Day (website) appears to have been a smashing success, as 40,000 people attended 450 events nationwide, according to the EAA. Check out coverage of events in Gainesville, Fla., Austin, Minn., and Fitchburg, Mass., where a flying car drew a crowd. 

Perhaps programs like this will help ensure the next generation of pilots are, in fact, experienced and ethical.  

A sole survivor of a crash 30 years ago reachest out to the sole survivor of the Libya crash

Norman Ollestad wrote a sort of open letter in the Los Angeles Times yesterday, directed to Ruben van Assouw, the 9-year-old sole survivor of last week’s airliner crash in Libya.

 

Ollestad, himself the sole survivor of a Cessna crash at age 11 that killed his father-mentor, his father’s girlfriend and the pilot, wishes for the boy to find solace in his aunt and uncle, as well as an emotional outlet.

 

After his experience, Ollestad said he wanted to go home, play with his friends. He wanted to make his life as normal as possible.

 

The letter writer, who last year published a highly acclaimed memoir (pictured above) of the 1979 crash and how it affected his life, said he could have benefitted from psychotherapy, a field that was somewhat socially frowned upon a generation ago.

 

“Ruben is special,” Ollestad writes. “Not even 10, he has endured two of the most monumental experiences a person can ever go through: The loss of a parent and a close look at death, his own mortality. I hope he is given the time and guidance to navigate this road to healing. In the bat of an eye he's been forced to grow up, a young boy facing the journey of a far older man.”

Aviation News Rundown: 89-year-old takes a flight, Japan airport works to ease flight regulations

AIN reported yesterday that a business-market survey for May, performed by UBS Investment Research, showed the corporate jet market holding steady. Industry-specific business conditions in general continue to swing upward as consumer interest rebounds. However, stagnant jet sales inventories dampen the climb. Used jet prices are stabilizing but continue to be well short of peak marks.

Another piece from AIN quotes Brian Foley Associates in saying that as the U.S. Dollar recovers, GA aircraft buyers will shift from non-North American buyers to a more-balanced mix of buyers.

Aviation Week reports that Dornier will assemble its Seastar CD2 amphibian outside of Montreal. Officials at the company, based in Florida, cited governmental support for the aviation industry, from the municipal to the national level, and the skilled labor pool in the area, helped finalized the decision to locate 250 jobs there.

In Japan, government officials are working to make the nation’s aviation regulations more friendly so more business jets land there. The country’s tourism ministry estimates that corporate flights to Japanese airports have dropped by about 4,000 annually in recent years.

The image above comes from AntiqueAirfield.com. Although it looks Photoshopped, it certainly is not. The snapshot places Boeing’s history in a single frame, as the Boeing 40 and Boeing 787 share the sky. Visit the link to see more images from the flight, as well as a behind-the-scenes pictorial showing how the shots were taken. Thanks to our friends at AirPigz.com for posting this on their site and Twitter account.

Would you like to see how youthful a flight in a single-piston aircraft can make an 89-year-old woman become? Check out this link from the Yamhill Valley (Oregon) News Register. A local program for seniors provides a chance to enjoy delayed dreams or rekindle distant memories.

In this case, Marion Field had not been in an airport in what probably was decades until Ageless Dreams arranged a plane ride for her. Her unbridled excitement shines throughout the story. One of the best quotes: “I’m gonna enjoy myself, you bet your boots.”

YouTube Turns 5: How technology is changing business and how we can help

News Flash: The Internet is changing the way we live our lives.

OK, so that is not news. And this post is not, per se, aviation related. However, it makes an interesting point that applies to the airfield and everywhere else.

Wired.com brings us news as YouTube celebrates its fifth anniversary that the video site dwarfs the number of people watching network television in prime time.

The article above goes as far as to wonder whether YouTube will replace broadcast and subscription TV altogether in coming years. Considering its impact in a half decade, it is an idea that is not out of reach.

As mobile entertainment and communications platforms continue to morph with technology, iPads, Droid phones and Skype, it changes the way we do business.

For instance, we now have a feature so someone interested in buying an aircraft can send a text message to the person selling it. Clients are meeting face to face via web cam.

Information is more accessible and moves much more freely. Just as the aircraft revolutionized business and personal travel in its golden age, information technology continues to do the same today.

It is important to make sure your business is visible in the ever-growing 21st Century marketplace.

We have delivered many tools over the years to help aircraft sales departments and FBOs do just that, and we are hard at work creating even more such platforms.

As a destination for pilots and flight staffs to find aviation information, we are a high-value target for anyone in the industry to utilize to get seen. 

Register for a My Flight Department account, list your business in our aviation directory, advertise with us.    

Weigh in below and let us know what you like about what we have done with the site, and what you would like to see.    

Thanks again for reading.

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