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Morning Rundown: This week starts off where last week ended

As we start the second full week in May, the biggest stories in aviation carry over from the first week.

Optimism is abundant among the industry, at least when judging by tradeshow turnout. EBAA President Brian Humphries said this year’s EBACE was the highest attended in history, with more people coming through the turnstiles in the first day of the 2010 convention than during the entire 2009 show.

Businesses and organizations filled more than 430 booths, alongside more than 60 aircraft featured in static displays.

Staying with Europe this morning where the skies are somewhat the same, bothersome. Rehashing the ash – volcanic ash – Monday again saw airport closures in Spain and elsewhere. Heathrow Airport reported passenger traffic down nearly 21 percent in April compared to the prior year, largely due to the eruption. Cargo traffic at the hub, however, was up 7.8 percent last month in metric tonnage.

In domestic airport news, Million Air celebrated the ‘soft opening’ of its facility at San Bernardino International Airport (SBD). An official grand opening will take place this summer.

From the desk of unfortunate irony this morning: As the media reports on the environmental and ecological damage suffered in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of a massive BP oilrig spill, the footprint of journalists in the area may be causing its own negative repercussions on regional wildlife.

Audubon Magazine reports that press helicopters have been flying illegally over Breton National Wildlife Refuge, a coastal bird sanctuary, causing disturbances. As oil has washed ashore, the facility has closed, creating a rough situation for those who care for the birds and other species.  

From the Audubon blog post linked above:

“We’ve done all this work to try and protect those islands with booms,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokesperson Chuck Underwood. “But in the end, folks flying in low and landing just to get their photographs has been disturbing the birds. In some cases, there has even been nest abandonment.”    

Cashing in on that $100 hamburger

With the weekend finally here, many recreational pilots will take to the sky with a tiding of good weather in search of that ever-allusive $100 hamburger.

While fuel and rental costs mean that burger likely will cost $200 or more, it’s the thrill of the flight that certainly outweighs the cost of getting to the meal.

Enjoy the journey, not the destination, right?

There are several great sites online to assist in finding where to land for that pancake, burger or whatever meal you desire, many of them featuring user feedback to know what others think of a place. Such tools help eliminate the dread of flying two hours to an unknown spot only to receive poor service.

Of course, right here on our site you can plug your destination into our Airport Resource Center and find a rental car, hotel, $100 hamburger, FBO or any other service you may need after landing. And our Max-Trax software is built to save you money on fuel along your route.

Other great sites for the pilot with the picky palette include Fly2Lunch.com. It features a great search tool, and its only setback is the lack of information at listed airports. (There are no diners listed on the site for FXE, FLL, OSH or even our beloved LOU).  

AdventurePilot.com provides a useful virtual map. Users plug in a home airport and set a nautical-mile radius. Press enter and see dozens, if not hundreds, of surrounding spots to play, eat, and sleep.

Perhaps the most simple and user-interactive $100 hamburger site is Flyingfood.com. Starting with its national map, a navigator can double click to zoom to a particular region, honing in on user-reviewed eateries. The numbers hovering above a location indicate the user rating of a spot.

Perhaps these tools keep you a happy pilot and never a hungry pilot.

If you happen to be flying to Louisville, I strongly recommend a stop at W.W. Cousins for your $100 hamburger. The staff cooks delicious burgers to order and bakes buns and desserts on site. A mile-long topping bar lets you pile on anything under the sun, from sweet pepper relish, jalapenos, Dusseldorf mustard and even fancy ketchup, you will find it all.

And it’s only a mile from Bowman Field. Perfect.

Please let us know about your endeavors to get a $100 (or however much it costs) hamburger in the comments section. And happy flying.

Advice on looking for an aircraft broker (via PlaneConversations.com)

Our friends at PlaneConversations.com posted an informative piece in the world of aircraft sales. Part of a larger series, it gives a breakdown of what to look when choosing an aircraft broker or dealer.

Like all professions, the aircraft brokerage business has people who do their jobs well, those who do their jobs poorly, and others in between.  Some of the most reputable brokers I know do not own aircraft inventory themselves.  However, if a broker (someone selling somebone else’s aircraft) is also a dealer (someone who buys aircraft for his own inventory), then it stands to reason that they know a little something about purchasing an aircraft.  So, find out whether your buyer’s agent/broker is also a dealer.Like all professions, the aircraft brokerage business has people who do their jobs well, those who do their jobs poorly, and others in between.  Some of the most reputable brokers I know do not own aircraft inventory themselves.  However, if a broker (someone selling somebone else’s aircraft) is also a dealer (someone who buys aircraft for his own inventory), then it stands to reason that they know a little something about purchasing an aircraft.  So, find out whether your buyer’s agent/broker is also a dealer.

Read the full piece here.

Morning Rundown: Casual Friday

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With EBACE wrapped up, it looks like a somewhat slow Friday morning in the world of aviation. Attention spans dwindle. Imaginations run to the big cookout or trip to lake this weekend. Before we get to all that, though, we shall throw some news and links your way. 

EBACE kept a positive note throughout, in what was the highest attended since 2007 and the second highest in the event's history. Michael A. Taverna of Aviation Week wraps up coverage by again focusing on business being on an uptick in the first quarter of 2010.

JSSI announced it has enrolled its 1,000th engine on its coverage plan.

England's Prince Henry learned today that he will train to fly Apache helicopters for the British Army. He hopes to return to action in Afghanistan.

For those of you who want more than news on this casual Friday, it is recommended to check out WINGsReality, an Internet-based reality-style series where pilots practice in emergency scenarios, then get judged by a panel. Check out the show, hosted at AtlantaWebFoundry.com, where we also found the video embedded above.

Finally, a good weekend to all. We wish a Happy Mother's Day to the moms in your families. In celebration, here is a link from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum that highlights the history of women in aviation.

 

Tense exchange between ATC and pilot at JFK

A recording posted on LiveATC.net Wednesday evening dictates an American Airlines Boeing 767 pilot telling the tower at JFK airport that he will declare an emergency if he cannot land on a particular runway.

From a New York Post article:

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