GlobalAir.com - Page 59 Aviation Articles

Aviation News Rundown: Libya crash, plus news from Learjet 85 and Chevron Aviation

In the early stages of investigation, Libyan officials do not suspect terrorism in the crash of an Airbus A330 Wednesday just short of the Tripoli International Airport runway on final approach. At least 96 of the 104 died on board the Afriqiyah Airways flight from Johannesburg, South Africa to the Libyan capital. Flight Global reports the aircraft, confirmed by Airbus as serial number 1024, had completed just 1,600 hours in 420 flights prior to the crash.

Libyan officials reported one Dutch child survivor from the flight. Witnesses said it "exploded on landing."   

UPDATE: Reuters reports that the Airbus involved in the crash had passed European spot checks.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Production of the mostly composite Lear 85 (pictured above) is on schedule, according to a report posted by AVWeb. Part assembly will begin in July in Mexico. The jet will be the first made by an American company to include Category 1 and Category 2 aircraft parts manufactured south of the border. Assembly will take place in Wichita, with the earliest deliveries arriving in 2013.

Meanwhile, delivery of the HondaJet again has been delayed until late 2012. An AP report cites a Honda spokesman blaming the second setback of a year or more on supplier delays of getting "unspecified major components" to the manufacturer.

Matt Thurber of AIN reports that Chevron Global Aviation will cease marketing Chevron and Texaco aviation fuel in 27 states, beginning Nov. 15. Chevron's distributor, Hiller/Air Petro, will continue serving operators in Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah and Washington.

In the realm of aviation economics and adding to the continued release of first-quarter reports, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association says piston aircraft shipments for the first three months of the year were off by more than 7 percent, while turboprop shipments dropped by 32.6 percent and jet deliveries sunk 14 percent, to 164 total. However, total billings increased by 7.1 percent.

Once-struggling NetJets reported that quarterly revenues increased by 18 percent compared to the
same period in 2009.

 

 

Before the Blog: From the Internet archives ... Alaska + Bear + Plane = Duct Tape

OK, the GlobalAir.com blog had yet to be established until earlier this month. Before then, a trove of wonderful stories spread across the Internet. On afternoons when nothing of the moment quenches our thirst for a good aviation story, we'll use an old one. Consider these posts like a nice antique store, without the constant odor of mothballs and Lemon Pledge.

Just because something is old news, though, does not mean everybody has heard the last word on a subject. So we welcome you to the stories that happened Before the Blog.

Today's tale goes all the way back to last fall, when an Alaskan bear ripped into a small Piper like a can of sardines. The pilot perservered, though, and so did his plane. 

A case of duct tape later, it never looked better. Check the video slideshow of the before and after shots below:

[youtube:123G3aPEkdM]

"Did the bear smell fish on board?"

"Can you really fly a plane like that or is this a hoax?"

"I hope that pilot has a bear-skin rug."

Stories circulated along with the email.

"That is so Photoshopped."

Even the message boards at Snopes and Myth Busters got in on the act as the story went viral.

Soon after the news/hoax broke, the Alaska Dispatch chased the story down and found out it is very much true, despite some of the facts passed around in the chain email not being entirely accurate.  And for those who wonder about the effectiveness of the tape: It's common practice among commercial aviation, only it's called speed tape.

Aviation News Rundown: A tribute to a local friend of the airport, plus news on the Boeing 787 and Cessna Citation

Longtime Bowman Field (LOU) airman Richard C. "Dick" Mulloy died Saturday. That is Mulloy above, in an image furnished by the Aero Club of Louisville, which published this about his life:

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Dick distinguished himself by playing in each of the post prestigious New Year’s Day Bowl games: The Sugar Bowl in 1940, the Rose Bowl in 1939 and the Orange Bowl in 1938, all for the University of Tennessee.

 

In addition to his football at Tennessee, he played football and baseball at St. Xavier High School in Kentucky, and was named All-State during his senior year. Once at Tennessee, he earned three letters in football and three in basketball. His 1940 football team was undefeated, untied and never scored on.

 

While at Tennessee he learned to fly, and in 1941, he entered the civilian pilot training program and later became a pilot instructor in the U. S. Army Primary Flying School. Later during World War II, he went to work for Chiang Kai-Shek under contract to the Chinese National Airlines flying “The Hump” across the Himalayas.

 

Following the war, Dick returned to Louisville and formed Kentucky Flying Service at Bowman Field. He built the organization over the years, operating out of the large hangar where they overhauled, maintained and sold aircraft.

 

In addition, Dick is credited with training more pilots than anyone else in this part of the country.

 

In 1987, he sold Kentucky Flying Service, and in 1992, he sold Helicopters, Inc., completing 47 years of operations at Bowman Field.

 _____________________________________________________________________________

 

In the news today, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week cites JP Morgan as saying the business jet market is "still in the doldrums," but recovery may only be a few quarters away. On the commercial side, the ax of poor economy continues to strike, as Reuters reports that Bahrain's state-owned Gulf Air has cut 500 jobs in the past six months.

On the positive side of commercial aviation, something that and can be seen as good news for Boeing's next generation of aircraft, the Gerson Lehrman Group notes that for every airliner cancelling a 787 order, another eager buyer is willing to take its place.

Finally, here are two industry announcements worth noting. Cessna introduced a program yesterday to reduce lead times for interior refurbishments on older Citations by stocking pre-selected, certified interior materials under a new program.

While the NBAA touted a resolution from the United States Senate that applauds general and business aviation for its efforts to provide relief to Haiti following the devastating earthquake in that nation early this year.

GA aircraft made more than 4,500 flights to Haiti during the first month following the disaster — when the airport and infrastructure were in shambles. At the same time, business aircraft performed more than 700 flights, transporting 3,500 passengers and delivering in excess of 1 million pounds of cargo and supplies.

Euro-volcano update


 


                                                                          Photograph courtesy Árni Sæberg, Icelandic Coast Guard


The Eurocontrol press office reports that flights were down by about 500 today (less than 2 percent), compared to 1,500 off on Sunday (roughly 7 percent). Tomorrow's volume could be reduced another 500 flights.

An area of ash in the North Atlantic continues to affect flight paths of jets into North America, making trips longer and costlier.

Read more via AviationNews.Us here.

And via the Australian Broadcasting Corporation here.

End of content

No more pages to load