News - Page 4 Aviation Articles

Chicago O'Hare gets first RNP approach

Chicago’s O’Hare airport recently implemented its first RNP (required navigation performance) instrument approach. The satellite-based precision approach is part of the new generation of GPS approaches popping up at airports around the nation and the world. Chris Baur, president and CEO of Hughes Aerospace, the company that developed the approach, told the Aviation Examiner David W. Thornton on Wednesday that the new approach is an environmentally friendly alternative to current land-based approaches.

Instrument approaches are the procedures used by pilots to locate the landing runway when the weather precludes a visual approach. At large airports like O’Hare (KORD), the typical method of tracking to the runway involves an ILS (instrument landing system) approach. ILS approaches use land-based transmitters to send signals to the pilots that bring the airplanes to the touchdown point on the runway both laterally (with a localizer) and vertically (with a glideslope). This requires two separate transmitter facilities for each runway that utilizes an ILS. This can be cost-prohibitive for small airports.

RNP approaches utilize satellite navigation technology instead of ground-based navigational facilities. The aircraft’s flight management computer is programmed to fly a predetermined course along a series of waypoints, locations on a map that do not have to coincide with any geographic feature, toward the runway. Because the airplane is following GPS waypoints, approaches can easily be planned to avoid terrain features or noise sensitive areas. They can also be developed over water where land-based facilities are impractical. At some airports, RNP approaches even follow a curved path to the runway using RF (radius to fix) segments, such as this approach at Atlanta’s Peachtree-DeKalb airport (KPDK).

Check out the rest of the David W. Thornton’s story here!

NBAA2014 to Host 'Careers in Business Aviation Day' on Oct. 23

Washington, DC, Oct. 6, 2014 – The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) will once again host Careers in Business Aviation Day on Oct. 23 during NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA2014), the business aviation industry’s largest annual event, and one of the biggest trade shows in the country. The dedicated career day, held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL, will feature education sessions and tours, and is open to middle school, high school and college students across the U.S. who are interested in exploring career opportunities in the business aviation industry.

Students will have the opportunity to visit more than 1,000 exhibits with NBAA volunteers, as well as engage with the expected 25,000 attendees representing the spectrum of business aviation’s diverse opportunities, from flight department personnel and aircraft manufacturers, to flight crews and the many businesses that serve the business aviation community. College and university students also will learn more about career opportunities and receive advice from university representatives and aviation professionals in an informal roundtable setting.

Several keynote speakers will welcome students to Orlando, including Amelia Rose Earhart, the youngest female to have circumnavigated the globe in a single-engine aircraft; Paul Rinaldi, president of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) and Brad Hayden, president and CEO of Robotic Skies and a leading expert on unmanned aircraft systems. Access to the 2014 Career Day is free for all registered students and faculty. Students attending University Aviation Association-affiliated colleges and universities also qualify for complimentary access to all three days of NBAA2014.

More than 200 students are expected to attend Careers in Business Aviation Day, including those from high schools in the Orlando area, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, University of Central Florida, University of Florida, University of North Dakota, Florida Technical College and many more.

  • Who: Careers in Business Aviation Day, part of NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA2014)
  • What: A one-day opportunity for students ages 12 and older to learn about career opportunities in business aviation, and throughout the aviation and aerospace fields
  • When: Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Where: Orange County Convention Center, 9990 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819

Learn more about Careers in Business Aviation Day at NBAA2014.

Founded in 1947 and based in Washington, DC, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) is the leading organization for companies that rely on general aviation aircraft to help make their businesses more efficient, productive and successful. The Association represents more than 10,000 companies and provides more than 100 products and services to the business aviation community, including the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, the world's largest civil aviation trade show. Learn more about NBAA at www.nbaa.org.

2014 Business Jet Traveler Survey says...

Business Jet Traveler magazine's fourth annual Reader's Choice survey is in their recent issue. They had over 1,200 readers respond, a new record for them. The big take-away from the survey is that things should continue to improve for business aviation. While about half stated their flying would remain at current levels, almost 40% stated they would fly a bit more or much more in the next year. Less than 10% said they would fly less in 2015.

The survey is to be posted online at bjtonline.com/2014survey. if you don't have access to the magazine. Here are my observations of that survey.

Why people fly privately doesn't really change. It saves time and general aviation serves many more airports than the airlines. The most important features people are looking for are range, economics, and cabin.  I see that in my consulting. What was interesting in that group was that cabin amenities, product support and baggage were at the bottom of the important features list. I think it is because product support is generally good and everyone expects the cabin amenities to be about the same within categories. Baggage is likely a tertiary item, especially since seats are rarely filled on many trips. Safety is important with over half stating they only fly with operators that have passed a safety audit (I think it should be 100%).

Of the non-owned methods of flying, fractional, jet cards, and charter, all three rated very good to excellent in customer service and cleanliness of aircraft.  Concerning choices of aircraft and age of aircraft, fractional and jet cards rated better than did charter. I was surprised at the charter choice of aircraft rating below the others. 

When it came to value for the price paid, fractional and charter rated better than jet cards. I think jet cards took a hit there as they also took a lower rating for transparency/explanation of charges.

For the owned aircraft category, BJT separated fixed-wing and helicopters. Since people valued range, economics, and cabin, I looked at those related ratings from the owned group. 

For the fixed wing: With respect to cost of maintenance, Embraer came out with the best ratings at 75.1% rating them excellent or very good. None of the other aircraft manufacturers listed had greater than 60% excellent or very good. Gulfstream rated over 99% excellent or very good for reliability. Everyone rated over 90% for reliability. Regarding cabin amenities, both Dassault and Gulfstream rated the best of the group. As both concentrate mostly on the large cabin jets, it makes sense that owners would be please with the offerings of the large cabin aircraft. Overall satisfaction was very good for everyone, but Dassault, Embraer and Gulfstream did rate a bit higher then the others. 

It looks like there were not a lot of responses from helicopter operators as only Airbus Helicopters (nee Eurocopter) and Bell were represented. Other than reliability, the helicopter manufacturers did not get as favorable ratings as did the fixed-wing. Cost of maintenance was a big knock against the helicopters with no one rating Airbus as excellent and Bell getting only 17.1% excellent ratings for their maintenance costs. I wonder if it is due to generally more complex maintenance requirements of a helicopter versus an airplane, especially with respect to time and cycle-limits on a helicopter's many components. 

BJT did ask its reader's that if they could get a year of complimentary flying, which aircraft would it be for various categories of aircraft? Read the article to see what folks favored. For me, they didn't list a P51 Mustang nor an amphibious Twin Otter so my top choices were not there. 

I'm hopeful that the BJT reader's interest in flying more in 2015 is representative of business flying in general. We shall see.

Drug Impairment Not Just an Aviation or Medical Certification Issue

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin – (September 10, 2014) – The National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday adopted recommendations to educate pilots on the potential impairment risks in prescription and over-the-counter medications, as use of such medications grows among the entire U.S. population.

NTSB also made six recommendations, four to the Federal Aviation Administration and two to state governments, on how to widen education efforts on impairment by such drugs as well as risks regarding marijuana use. NTSB will also issue a safety alert to pilots regarding the impairment risks of prescription and over-the-counter medications.

"The study focuses on general aviation pilots as a basis for considering the impact of medications on all transportation modes, because it is about the only data set available thanks to mandatory post mortem toxicological screening following fatal accidents. Other modes of personal and recreational transportation are not subject to these requirements," said Doug Macnair, EAA’s vice president of government relations. "This initial step does not single general aviation out from other transportation modes. NTSB researchers told the Board several times that there is still much to learn before any conclusions can be made. The aircraft accident rate has continued to fall over the 22-year period of the study, and accidents where impairment by medications or drugs are determined to be a causal factor have not increased over that period of time."

The recommendations came after a Board study showed that since 1990, the number of pilot fatalities involving impairment continued to be a minimal percentage. The most common drug found was diphenhydramine, often found in cold and allergy medications. The findings also showed, unsurprisingly, that prescription and over-the-counter medication use grew with the age of the pilots studied.

"Read the label and find information about these medications," responded Dr. Loren Groff, one of the NTSB researchers, when asked by Board member Mark Rosekind what pilots should take away from the study.

The researchers also mentioned that the findings do not cast any particular conclusion on those without medical certification, such as sport pilots, who were involved in fatal accidents. Board member Robert Sumwalt asked how the study might affect the push for third-class medical certification reform, but researchers agreed that more information was needed to establish any connection.

Among the recommendations made by the NTSB were four to the FAA:

  • Develop educational information for pilots about potentially impairing drugs, and make pilots aware of less impairing alternatives if they are available;
  • Gather more information about the flying activity of pilots not subject to medical certification;
  • Study the prevalence of drug use among pilots who are not involved in accidents;
  • Develop and distribute a clear policy regarding any marijuana use by airmen regardless of the type of flight operations.

NTSB also made two recommendations to states:

  • Medical providers make available much-needed information about the impairing effects of drugs – not only to pilots, but to operators of vehicles in any mode of transportation;
  • Use existing newsletters for doctors, pharmacists, and any other health professionals to help educate operators in all modes of transportation.

"We agree that there needs to be more education on the effects of medications and drugs in all modes of transportation," Macnair said. "We also believe that the medical education requirement included as part of the EAA/AOPA proposal for aeromedical reform addresses the knowledge gap that exists in the pilot population on the impairing effects of prescription and over-the-counter medications. Nothing in the medical certification process that exists today effectively accomplishes that.

"The goal of the EAA/AOPA medical reform effort is to reduce unnecessary cost and complexity of medical certification, while improving the education of pilots in a manner allowing them to make smart, informed decisions and thus enhance overall safety."

About EAA

EAA embodies the spirit of aviation through the world’s most engaged community of aviation enthusiasts. EAA’s 185,000 members and 1,000 local chapters enjoy the fun and camaraderie of sharing their passion for flying, building and restoring recreational aircraft. For more information on EAA and its programs, call 800-JOIN-EAA (800-564-6322) or go to www.eaa.org . For continual news updates, connect with www.twitter.com/EAAupdate .

National Aviation Day: A Look Back at Aviation through the Years


Photo: Library of Congress

August 19th is National Aviation Day, a day on which many of us involved in aviation reflect on the past, present and future of our industry. Since it's the past that got us to where we are today - an aviation industry focused on innovation and technology - this year on National Aviation Day, take time to consider how far the aviation industry has come. From the earliest balloons to the Boeing 747, and from the Wright Brothers to the F-35, here are a few aviation highlights that will take you back in time.

Early Flight
Birds and Balloons - Before airplanes, scientists were studying birds, balloons, and other flying contraptions. According to the Library of Congress, the first kite was invented as early as 1000 B.C. in China. The Chinese later used kites to measure distances and for reconnaissance. As kites and other flying wings were being developed during this time, Leonardo Da Vinci was studying the flight of birds and developing designs for flying machines. Balloons became popular in the 1700s, after the Montgolfier brothers powered the first balloon flights.

The First Fixed Wing Aircraft - Balloons were no match for Sir George Cayley, also known as the Father of the Aeroplane, who first noticed and recorded the four forces of flight. Cayley also design the first fixed-wing aircraft and was perhaps the first modern engineer, researching and recording the first theories about stability & control and wing dihedral.

Langley vs. Gustav Whitehead vs. the Wright Brothers - In the early 1900s, Samuel Langley was designing and building the first airplanes with a grant from the U.S. government. Langley was unsuccessful, and during the same time, the Wright brothers successfully made the first flight at Kitty Hawk in 1903. Later, witnesses would claim the Gustav Whitehead had actually successfully completed the first manned flight in 1901, two years before the Wright brothers, but his flight are unrecognized due to lack of proof.

Going the Distance
The 1900s brought considerable advancements in aviation. With two world wars, competition was heavy, bringing many "firsts" in aviation and rapid progression.

Crossing the English Channel - 1909 brought the first crossing the English Channel by a heavier-than-air aircraft - a simple monoplane piloted by aviation pioneer Louis Bleriot.

US Airmail - In 1911, the U.S. started using aircraft for air mail. In 1911, the first U.S. airmail flight occurred. Many more would follow, and in 1914, with World War I about to being, The Benoist Company started the first scheduled passenger airline service between St. Petersburg and Tampa, Florida.

Crossing the Atlantic - In 1919, the infamous Vickers Vimy made the first nonstop Atlantic crossing while the military developed bombers and fighter aircraft. Charles Lindbergh completed the first flight solo nonstop Atlantic crossing in 1927, becoming an aviation legend.

Barnstomers
The post-World War I era brought a surplus of inexpensive aircraft - specifically the Curtis JN-4 "Jenny" - to the civilian world, and people started flying these airplanes around to give rides and performing air show type stunts. These "barnstormers" as they were named, operated out of fields and traveled frequently.

Modern Flight
Post- World War I and World War II brought even more advancements, like instrument flight, jet engines, supersonic flight and a trip to the moon!

First Instrument Flight-In 1929, Jimmy Doolittle took off, flew and landed without any outside references. Doolittle is also credited with discovering the visual and motion limitations involved with instrument flight, including the idea of trusting the instruments over bodily sensations.

Jet Engines, Supersonic Flight and Moon Landings - The 1930s brought us the first practical jet aircraft - the HE-178 Heinkel - and Chuck Yeager's legendary flight that broke the sound barrier for the first time. By the 1970s, Boeing was making the 747 and the first Concorde entered service, capable of supersonic flight from New York to London in just less than three hours - incredible by anyone's account. And do you think Sir George Cayley or the Wright brothers have ever imagined we'd land on the moon in 1969?

While the supersonic transport aircraft industry didn't take off, today's technology is amazing, nonetheless. With airliners like the A380, capable of transporting over 800 passengers, stealth technology found in the B-2 Bomber and now the F-35, composite materials and electric powered aircraft, the aviation industry continues to advance in fascinating ways.

This year on National Aviation Day, what part of aviation history will you remember and celebrate?

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