Press Release - Page 2 Aviation Articles

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2015 to Host Word-Record Skydiving Attempts During Afternoon Air Shows

Skydiving Hall of Fame to organize international teams of expert jumpers

Skydiver courtesy cristinasz @ Morguefile

Photo courtesy [email protected]

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin - A world-record skydive attempt will be part of EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2015, with an international team of top skydivers aiming to make history at The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration. EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2015 is July 20-26 at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

The Skydiving Hall of Fame based in Fredericksburg, Virginia, will organize the 108-person jump team for the record attempts sanctioned by the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (FAI), which is the official organization that maintains the world’s aviation-related records. The teams will practice and prepare with record attempts at Skydive Chicago in Ottawa, Illinois, before the scheduled record attempts on July 22 and 24 at Oshkosh (weather and conditions permitting).

"Skydivers have been part of the EAA AirVenture air show for decades, but the opportunity to have a world-record attempt at Oshkosh is something unprecedented here, and very exciting," said Rick Larsen, EAA’s vice president of communities and member programs, who leads the AirVenture event organizing team. "The Skydiving Hall of Fame is bringing the best of the best in their community to Oshkosh, matching the standard of performers that have made the AirVenture air show a true all-star event."

The Skydiving Hall of Fame team, known as the Eagles, will jump from as high as 20,000 feet from its Short SC.7 Skyvan and deHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otters to begin their record attempts. Any record would then be confirmed by FAI and its U.S. representative, the National Aeronautic Association (NAA).

"These seasoned skydivers, who are among the best in the world, face enormous challenges," said James F. (Curt) Curtis, president and CEO of the Skydiving Museum & Skydiving Hall of Fame. "To achieve an FAI world record while performing a high-profile professional exhibition requires extraordinary skill, talent and focus. But the opportunity to attempt this at Oshkosh during AirVenture week is a unique moment for our community."

About the Skydiving Museum & Skydiving Hall of Fame

The purpose of the Skydiving Museum is to recognize and promote the sport of skydiving through public education and awareness; recognize the contribution to skydiving by its participants, suppliers and supporters; capture forever the history of the sport via its events, equipment and personalities; and enhance aviation safety. Established by the Museum in 2010, the Skydiving Hall of Fame recognizes and honors those who, through leadership, innovations and/or outstanding achievements have defined, promoted, inspired and advanced skydiving at the highest and sustained levels in the past present, and for future generations of skydivers. More information on the museum and its programs is available at skydivingmuseum.org.

About EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh is "The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration" and EAA’s yearly membership convention. Additional EAA AirVenture information, including advance ticket and camping purchase, is available online at www.airventure.org. EAA members receive lowest prices on admission rates. For more information on EAA and its programs, call 1-800-JOIN-EAA (1-800-564-6322) or visit www.eaa.org. Immediate news is available at www.twitter.com/EAAupdate.

CAVEAT EMPTOR

The world of aircraft sales is fraught with risk and it is a wise buyer who retains professional assistance in the process of buying or selling an airplane. However, the risk in the selection process is not merely limited to what airplane to choose. In some cases the risk starts with the advisor you choose!

Just because someone holds themselves out as having years of experience in the aviation industry does not necessarily make them an expert in the preowned marketplace. This subset of the aircraft sales profession suffers from an overabundance of self-proclaimed experts who in reality have little or no experience in this unique arena. They may very well have held jobs directly related to the operation, maintenance or even sold new aircraft, but it is a misconception to think that they thus hold the skill set necessary to see a complex transaction through from start to finish. If the deal is more complex, such as a cross-border sale or dealing with a repossession, then you need to make sure that the agent you hire has that specific experience. Nearly all my peers at one time or another have encountered legal counsel who seem to think they can manage the deal better than an experienced preowned salesperson. Perhaps the perceived largess to be earned, accolades to be bestowed or allure of mixing with the top one percenters and business leaders the world over draws folks to the aircraft sales world like a moth to flame. Caveat emptor.

In absence of any regulation or requirement for formal credentials that substantiate one is qualified to conduct a pre-owned aircraft sales transaction, the prospective buyer or seller has little to go on in terms of validating a broker’s level of expertise other than perhaps word of mouth or advertising. While references and recommendations should be requested and verified, does the enduser really understand what qualifies as experience in the preowned aircraft sales marketplace? Being a nice person alone is not good enough. Having years of new aircraft sales experience is not enough. Having spent a career specializing in a particular area of the aviation industry is not enough. Advertising in the aviation industry can be a lot of smoke and mirrors and if you do not know what you are reading, you can easily be beguiled into believing that bigger is better. Anyone can create glossy advertising depicting a wide array of aircraft for sale, but do they really? All the while making claims as to their expertise in aircraft sales.

As you might have guessed, I am here to offer a short tutorial on what to look for when evaluating who to hire to handle your aircraft acquisition or sale. First time buyers in particular…pay attention! You are most at risk as you will for the most part have no basis for comparison. An experienced preowned aircraft sales expert is completely comfortable with taking a transaction from start to finish. As one would expect, they should have an industry network in place, first-hand experience working with the various maintenance facilities and other experts you may seek to employ in the sales process including escrow agents, free-lance technical advisors and legal counsel. After all you are paying that individual to in essence be a project manager and they should have a working knowledge of what each party in a qualified go-to team brings to the table.

An experienced aircraft sales professional will have access to research data for a particular make/model of airplane including comps on which to base what you should be paying for a targeted airplane. Indepth primary research of course assures you of complete coverage. If the salesperson you are dealing with is not able to reach out to each and every owner within a select make/model, then you are not getting what you are in part paying them for. While it doesn’t mean you should not buy an already advertised airplane, you do want to be assured you did not miss any off-market opportunities.

An experienced aircraft sales professional is familiar with all the documents necessary to conduct an aircraft sale. These include, but are not limited to, all FAA documents(if a domestic U.S. sale), transactional instruments such as a Letter of Intent (LOI) or Aircraft Purchase and Sale Agreement (APSA) and the International Registry. Most aircraft sales-professionals are comfortable in drafting at least a template for an LOI and the APSA. If your expert is reluctant to do so, then at the very least they should be actively engaged in assisting legal counsel in the construction of said documents, review and negotiation in an effort to accurately put forth the mechanics of the sale and otherwise avoid obstructions and encumbrances. The list of documents grows if the sale is cross-border in nature and this is not time for your “expert” to be learning how to conduct such a transaction. Of course there is a first-time for everyone and I don’t begrudge anyone a learning curve. As much as ninety percent of the transactions my company is involved in are cross-border in nature and on many an occasion we work with an agent representing the other side who has limited experience in such. Eighty-nine percent of the time they are grateful for the assistance we offer in navigating this territory and welcome suggestions as to how to speed the plow. After all, we share a common interest and that is to conclude the transaction.

Consider it a home run if you find yourself working with an aircraft sales professional who is comfortable with conducting a first-hand review of the subject airplane and records. While the level of familiarity with the plane and logs one should have need not be on the level of a pilot or A & P mechanic, it certainly should be to the extent that one knows what attributes as well as potential problems to look for. They should also be on-site during critical junctures in the prepurchase evaluation. This includes any time a repair is called for, at the time the discrepancy list is prepared and made available for review and at the conclusion of the maintenance so verification of fault rectification is made in a timely fashion. Caveat emptor.

Timing is everything they say and no less so when it comes to an aircraft sales transaction. An aircraft sales professional will have a keen sense of timing and will keep an eye on the specific dates of performance written into an APSA. While we all want to trust that everyone will do their job, an aircraft sales person may have to help marshal the deal along, particularly when it comes to the prebuy, and they should have no reservations in doing so. The squeaky wheel gets the grease. As well, they will have a checklist of what needs to be accomplished in order to close the deal and will keep the parties to the transaction aware of what is done and needs to yet be accomplished. There are delays and then there are delays, but don’t let the delay occur because tasks were left to within days of Closing. Caveat emptor. As this blog unfolds I realize I have just scratched the surface of the myriad of steps and tasks that encompass an aircraft sale. I could write a book, but then I could just keep writing my blog pro bono.

NBAA2014 to Host 'Careers in Business Aviation Day' on Oct. 23

Washington, DC, Oct. 6, 2014 – The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) will once again host Careers in Business Aviation Day on Oct. 23 during NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA2014), the business aviation industry’s largest annual event, and one of the biggest trade shows in the country. The dedicated career day, held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL, will feature education sessions and tours, and is open to middle school, high school and college students across the U.S. who are interested in exploring career opportunities in the business aviation industry.

Students will have the opportunity to visit more than 1,000 exhibits with NBAA volunteers, as well as engage with the expected 25,000 attendees representing the spectrum of business aviation’s diverse opportunities, from flight department personnel and aircraft manufacturers, to flight crews and the many businesses that serve the business aviation community. College and university students also will learn more about career opportunities and receive advice from university representatives and aviation professionals in an informal roundtable setting.

Several keynote speakers will welcome students to Orlando, including Amelia Rose Earhart, the youngest female to have circumnavigated the globe in a single-engine aircraft; Paul Rinaldi, president of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) and Brad Hayden, president and CEO of Robotic Skies and a leading expert on unmanned aircraft systems. Access to the 2014 Career Day is free for all registered students and faculty. Students attending University Aviation Association-affiliated colleges and universities also qualify for complimentary access to all three days of NBAA2014.

More than 200 students are expected to attend Careers in Business Aviation Day, including those from high schools in the Orlando area, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, University of Central Florida, University of Florida, University of North Dakota, Florida Technical College and many more.

  • Who: Careers in Business Aviation Day, part of NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA2014)
  • What: A one-day opportunity for students ages 12 and older to learn about career opportunities in business aviation, and throughout the aviation and aerospace fields
  • When: Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Where: Orange County Convention Center, 9990 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819

Learn more about Careers in Business Aviation Day at NBAA2014.

Founded in 1947 and based in Washington, DC, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) is the leading organization for companies that rely on general aviation aircraft to help make their businesses more efficient, productive and successful. The Association represents more than 10,000 companies and provides more than 100 products and services to the business aviation community, including the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, the world's largest civil aviation trade show. Learn more about NBAA at www.nbaa.org.

Drug Impairment Not Just an Aviation or Medical Certification Issue

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin – (September 10, 2014) – The National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday adopted recommendations to educate pilots on the potential impairment risks in prescription and over-the-counter medications, as use of such medications grows among the entire U.S. population.

NTSB also made six recommendations, four to the Federal Aviation Administration and two to state governments, on how to widen education efforts on impairment by such drugs as well as risks regarding marijuana use. NTSB will also issue a safety alert to pilots regarding the impairment risks of prescription and over-the-counter medications.

"The study focuses on general aviation pilots as a basis for considering the impact of medications on all transportation modes, because it is about the only data set available thanks to mandatory post mortem toxicological screening following fatal accidents. Other modes of personal and recreational transportation are not subject to these requirements," said Doug Macnair, EAA’s vice president of government relations. "This initial step does not single general aviation out from other transportation modes. NTSB researchers told the Board several times that there is still much to learn before any conclusions can be made. The aircraft accident rate has continued to fall over the 22-year period of the study, and accidents where impairment by medications or drugs are determined to be a causal factor have not increased over that period of time."

The recommendations came after a Board study showed that since 1990, the number of pilot fatalities involving impairment continued to be a minimal percentage. The most common drug found was diphenhydramine, often found in cold and allergy medications. The findings also showed, unsurprisingly, that prescription and over-the-counter medication use grew with the age of the pilots studied.

"Read the label and find information about these medications," responded Dr. Loren Groff, one of the NTSB researchers, when asked by Board member Mark Rosekind what pilots should take away from the study.

The researchers also mentioned that the findings do not cast any particular conclusion on those without medical certification, such as sport pilots, who were involved in fatal accidents. Board member Robert Sumwalt asked how the study might affect the push for third-class medical certification reform, but researchers agreed that more information was needed to establish any connection.

Among the recommendations made by the NTSB were four to the FAA:

  • Develop educational information for pilots about potentially impairing drugs, and make pilots aware of less impairing alternatives if they are available;
  • Gather more information about the flying activity of pilots not subject to medical certification;
  • Study the prevalence of drug use among pilots who are not involved in accidents;
  • Develop and distribute a clear policy regarding any marijuana use by airmen regardless of the type of flight operations.

NTSB also made two recommendations to states:

  • Medical providers make available much-needed information about the impairing effects of drugs – not only to pilots, but to operators of vehicles in any mode of transportation;
  • Use existing newsletters for doctors, pharmacists, and any other health professionals to help educate operators in all modes of transportation.

"We agree that there needs to be more education on the effects of medications and drugs in all modes of transportation," Macnair said. "We also believe that the medical education requirement included as part of the EAA/AOPA proposal for aeromedical reform addresses the knowledge gap that exists in the pilot population on the impairing effects of prescription and over-the-counter medications. Nothing in the medical certification process that exists today effectively accomplishes that.

"The goal of the EAA/AOPA medical reform effort is to reduce unnecessary cost and complexity of medical certification, while improving the education of pilots in a manner allowing them to make smart, informed decisions and thus enhance overall safety."

About EAA

EAA embodies the spirit of aviation through the world’s most engaged community of aviation enthusiasts. EAA’s 185,000 members and 1,000 local chapters enjoy the fun and camaraderie of sharing their passion for flying, building and restoring recreational aircraft. For more information on EAA and its programs, call 800-JOIN-EAA (800-564-6322) or go to www.eaa.org . For continual news updates, connect with www.twitter.com/EAAupdate .

Landmark Aviation Completes Acquisition of Ross Aviation

Image Courtesy Landmark Aviation

(Houston, TX – August 1, 2014) Landmark Aviation has completed the acquisition of Ross Aviation, a network of fixed based operations located throughout the United States.

Headquartered in Denver, Colorado, Ross Aviation operates in major cities and resort destinations within the U.S., including Denver (BJC), Santa Fe (SAF), Miami (OPF), and six locations in Hawaii. The acquisition has increased the size of Landmark’s network from 57 to 75 locations globally.

"We are very excited to welcome these 18 locations into our network," stated President and CEO Dan Bucaro. "They are geographically a good fit with their strength in the west and Hawaii. We also look forward to building strong relationships with the various airport authorities and being active in each of those communities."

The Ross locations will begin operating under the Landmark Aviation brand immediately.

About Landmark Aviation

Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Landmark Aviation operates a network of fixed base operations located throughout the U.S., and in Canada and Western Europe. The Company offers a wide range of services, including FBO, MRO, charter and management. Landmark is a portfolio company of The Carlyle Group. For more information, visit www.landmarkaviation.com.

About The Carlyle Group

The Carlyle Group (NASDAQ: CG) is a global alternative asset manager with over $199 billion of assets under management. Carlyle's purpose is to invest wisely and create value. Carlyle invests across four segments – Corporate Private Equity, Real Assets, Global Market Strategies and Fund of Funds Solutions – in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East, North America and South America. Carlyle has expertise in various industries, including: aerospace, defense & government services, consumer & retail, energy, financial services, healthcare, industrial, technology & business services, telecommunications & media and transportation. The Carlyle Group employs 1,600 people in 38 offices across six continents.

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