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High-Wing Vs. Low-Wing Aircraft

by Tori Williams 3. May 2017 17:28
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One of the first things an aspiring pilot learns is that not all aircraft are created equal. At least, not in the eyes of other pilots. It doesn’t take very many conversations with a pilot to find out exactly what type of aircraft they love and hate. Some pilots have good reasons for preferring one type over another, while others just have a soft spot for a certain type they trained in or became infatuated with.

The disagreements cover a variety of aircraft types. Tailwheel verses nose gear, retractable versus fixed gear, G1000 versus the historic six-pack. Each of these has been debated between pilots for years and I’m sure they will continue to be debated. Another popular category is high-wing verses low-wing aircraft. I personally have a preference for high-wing, as the vast majority of my flight time has been in Cessna 172s and a Stinson 10A.

I was curious what the general consensus was on where the best location for the wings is, so I took to the Internet and… Found no clear answer. It seems that there are pros and cons to both configurations, and it almost always boiled down to preference over hard facts. I have compiled a few major things to consider if you are in the scenario where you must choose between a high-wing or low-wing aircraft.

Visibility

Visibility was one of the first things pilots commented on when debating between the two. High-wing aircraft simply give pilot and passengers a better view of the sky around them and ground below them. They are ideal for an introduction flight, cruising around for fun, or flying on missions that require a clear view of the ground. Low-wing aircraft offer outstanding views of the world above the cockpit, but the wings can block anything below.

Accessibility

When fueling on the ground, it is usually much easier to access the tanks on a low-wing aircraft. Most high-wing fuel tanks require standing on a ladder to reach. However, the flip side of this is that it is more difficult to reach the fuel drains and visually inspect the underside of the wing on a low-wing aircraft.

Ground Clearance

Pilots of low-wing aircraft have to be more conscientious of any obstacles on the ground. This includes taxiway lights, tie-downs, and airport signage. The high-wing pilot still has to watch out, but has the ease of knowing their wings are not in such close proximity.

Safety

In the event of an emergency landing, low-wing aircraft have the advantage of being able to absorb some of the crash impact in the wings instead of the fuselage. They also help in the event of a water landing, having the potential to float above the water for a short period of time.

Some pilots love having shade under their wings on a hot summer day. Other pilots prefer being able to set maps or logbooks on the wing during preflight. Some pilots hate having to walk on the wing to get into the aircraft.

At the end of the day, there is no clear winner. It seems that it mostly comes down to personal preference and familiarity with the type of aircraft. Do you prefer high-wing or low-wing? What do you think makes one better than the other? Let me know in the comments below!

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Aircraft Sales | Aviation Safety | Flying | Tori Williams

Gulfstream Becomes a Business Aviation Icon

by Tori Williams 17. March 2017 16:14
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There’s no doubt that Gulfstream Aerospace has been getting a lot of attention lately. They debuted their brand new G500 model at NBAA last year, as well as continued to break world records for speed in their G650ER model. The attention is well earned, as they are quickly becoming one of the biggest icons in business aviation.

Gulfstream has had their focus on luxurious business aviation aircraft since the beginning. The company began in the late 1950s when Grumman Aircraft Engineering Co., known for their military aircraft production, developed their first business aircraft at the end of World War II. Grumman decided to split their military and civilian aircraft production to increase efficiency. The civilian branch moved to Savannah, Georgia and eventually came to be known as Gulfstream Aerospace. http://www.gulfstream.com/company/history

Their history is full of record-setting firsts in business aviation, beginning with the GII model, which became the first business jet to cross the Atlantic Ocean nonstop in 1968. Their innovation and pursuit of perfection continued as they developed and produced more business jet models, including the GIV featuring civil aviation’s first digital flight-management computers in the cockpit.

According to new market research, the global business-jet market was valued at $20.9 billion in 2013 and is expected to reach $33.8 billion by the end of 2020. http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/PressReleases/business-jet.asp With endless possibilities for innovation on the horizon, the market is sure to hold strong for many years to come. Companies like Beechcraft and Cessna provide steep competition, but Gulfstream has been able to continually stay ahead of the curb and produce quality, desirable aircraft.

It is very likely they will continue their reign as an icon in the business jet world for years to come. The diversity of their fleet, the wonderful craftsmanship of their designs, and the innovation of their technologies are all factors that critics rave about with each new model. Gulfstream truly has a bright future, and an enormously impressive past.

For the current market and trends see https://www.globalair.com/aircraft-for-sale/Private-Jet/Gulfstream-Aerospace

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Tori Williams

The Best Free Online Aviation Resources

by Tori Williams 1. February 2017 20:30
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It’s no secret, being a pilot is expensive. Especially during the initial training phase where you have to worry about plane rental, fuel costs, paying your instructor, purchasing study materials, paying for written exams and checkride fees. That doesn’t even include the hundreds of dollars you spend on a headset, kneeboard, charts, foggles, and any other required materials for beginning your piloting career or hobby.

While it is worth spending a little extra money for quality flight training, there are also plenty of free resources available for student pilots to take advantage of. I’ve compiled a list of my favorite completely free aviation resources for you to check out and hopefully benefit from! Do you have a favorite free resource? Let me know in the comments below!

1. FAA FAR AIM

As any good student pilot knows, the Federal Aviation Regulations are everything. Love them or hate them, you’re going to have to know and understand a good chunk of them for your checkride. Luckily for you, these regulations are publically available for free on the FAA Website. This might not be the most exciting news, but it is handy for quick reference if you don’t have a physical copy on hand.

2. Podcasts

I was surprised by the amount of times I heard my fellow pilots talking about aviation podcasts that they listened to while I was at my flight university. As it turns out, there are quite a few great quality podcasts out there for new and seasoned pilots alike. A few of my favorites are The Finer Points, Coffee Break Flight Instruction, and Airplane Geeks. There are tons more out there with topics ranging from flight instruction to military aircraft to aviation current events. A quick Google search can bring up dozens!

3. AOPA Student Resources

An AOPA membership is known for being a great resource to the world of aviation, but they also have several free resources available without a membership. Student pilots have access to tons of articles, event calendars, and flight planning tools right at their fingertips. To sweeten the deal, AOPA is offering 6 months of free membership to student pilots, including 6 monthly issues of their Flight Training Magazine. That’s an offer you can’t refuse!

4. Pilots of YouTube

For someone like me who is an extremely visual learner, YouTube has been a lifesaver. A quick search on YouTube for “flight training” resulted in 5,180,000 videos. Of course, not all of these are going to be winners. However, there are several that have a great way of explaining private and instrument pilot techniques and information. I highly recommend poking around to see what has been created, or searching for the specific problem you are stuck on.

5. GlobalAir.com

Did you know that the very site you are on right now has several wonderful (and completely free!) aviation resources? Our Aviation Directory is a great source to find links to all things in the flying world. Check out the “Airport Resource” tab to look up detailed information about any airport, or to check the fuel prices at thousands of airports around the nation. There is so much you can learn from the information listed on GlobalAir.com. Go ahead and check it out!

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Aviation Safety | Flying | Tori Williams

Top 5 Interesting Airport Facts

by Tori Williams 1. November 2016 20:30
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This semester has been one long lesson into all things airport operations related. When I am not at school taking such classes as Airport Operations and Aviation Administration Decision Making, I am at the Lexington airport soaking up knowledge from my airport operations internship. I have never had a semester where I felt I experienced and could apply the material I was learning in such a way as this. I have been extremely blessed with my internship and the amazing professors at Eastern.

In a strange way, my lessons outside of the classroom have lined up perfectly with the lessons in class more times than I can count. For example, we had a lesson about airport wildlife management at school and then during my time at the airport that day we encountered birds, deer, and checked the wildlife traps. My coworkers are very good at turning things we encounter into learning moments, so I have heard countless stories and gotten hands-on experience with a lot of things my classmates are only reading about.

During this awesome semester I have learned a few airport facts that truly surprised me. I gathered my top five to share here.

1. Airports make an enormous percentage of their revenue from parking

I was surprised to find out that of the overall revenue that airports acquire, non-aeronautical revenue accounts for nearly half of the total. This exact number of their non-aeronautical revenue is 44.8%, according to one study. Parking and transportation alone contribute to 41.2% of the total revenue, putting it in a category of its own. This is one of those facts that make sense if you think about it, after all airports almost always charge for parking and thousands of cars come through every day. Several major airports also contract out parking. Companies will bid on a parking contract and whoever wins is in charge of parking at that airport. This seems to be efficient for both the airport and the parking companies.

2.TSA is under a microscope

Nobody particularly enjoys going through TSA, and it often seems ridiculous to have to remove your belt and shoes to not be a threat to national security. However, one fascinating thing I have learned is that TSA often gets tested themselves. The TSA inspector will occasionally send volunteers, usually new airport employees who have not been seen by TSA yet, though the TSA security line with explosives or other prohibited items stashed in their carry-on. In some cases, they will even strap the prohibited substance to the bodies of the volunteers to see if the TSA screener can find it that way. The supervisor on shift is made aware before testing begins so they will be prepared and not let the screener call airport police on the volunteer. Thankfully Lexington has been extremely successful in their testing, but other airports have not been so lucky.

3. Airports send birds to The Smithsonian

Whenever there is a bird strike and the airport cannot discern the species of bird, they must send DNA to The Smithsonian. That can be feathers, a sample of the bird guts, or both, depending on the state of the animal when they are found. The Smithsonian then analyzes the DNA to accurately identify the species of bird, and returns that information to the airport to include in their wildlife strike report.

4. Airport record keeping is insane

One thing I instantly noticed about working in operations is that there are dozens of large, thick binders filled with papers that they are constantly referencing, updating, and archiving. The airport is required to keep certain records for up to two years. That means that even if someone hasn’t worked at the airport in a year and a half, they still have a massive binder dedicated to them with all of their training records. Other binders include the unofficial version of the airport certification manual, dozens of maps of the airfield, badging applications, and many more that I have not yet seen. Someone could easily spend days reading these binders and not see half of the material the airport keeps on hand.

5. Airport expansion is very complicated

Commercial and GA airports alike face a number of challenges when it comes to growth. Many communities do not understand how great aviation can be for their local economy, so they oppose runway expansion projects and even the simplest changes to the airport. I found it particularly interesting using Lexington as a case study, as their airport is surrounded by horse farms owned by some of the biggest names in horse breeding and racing. It would be extremely difficult for them to expand because of the value of the land around them. Airports constantly have to balance growth with community relations, far more than several other industries.

I hope that you have learned at least one interesting fact by reading this article, and I can’t wait to learn more as I become more knowledgeable on airport operations! It is a whole world of intricacies and innovations that I am lucky to be part of!

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Airports | Tori Williams

Top Airport Stress-Relief Upgrades

by Tori Williams 2. October 2016 00:41
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To the majority of passengers on commercial flights, traveling can be a stressful and sometimes uncomfortable experience. Long lines to check in, confusing security rules, and having to rush to your gate after all is said and done can drive even the most understanding person crazy. On top of all that, several airports have puzzling signage and unclear instructions for moving between terminals. This can leave the passenger with a sense of dismay and dread when trying to navigate through to their flight. Thankfully, several airports have recently begun revitalizing their interiors and amenities in an effort to reduce passenger stress and create an overall ambiance of ease. I found several examples online and I picked my top 4 to share with you here.

1. Narita Airport Running Lanes

Well in advance of the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, Narita International Airport decided to redesign the interior of their airport with a minimalist and easily navigated layout. Inspired by running tracks, these blue and red lanes show passengers exactly where they are heading. Blue represents departures and red represents arrivals. The designers chose these colors with purpose, too. Blue, the color of the sky, uplifts passengers and excites them for the travels ahead. Red, a more earthy tone, is there for arriving passengers as they conclude their travels and return to the ground.

2. San Francisco Yoga Room

No, you have not been transported to a peaceful yoga studio. You are in fact in Terminal 2 of San Francisco International Airport, just on the other side of the TSA checkpoint. A few years ago the airport converted a storage closet into a fully functioning yoga room, featuring dim lights, a mirrored wall, complementary mats and blocks. This free service has helped many a weary passenger feel at ease during their stressful layovers. In fact, it has rave reviews on its Yelp page. Quite an interesting and helpful addition to the amenities offered at SFO.

3. Canine Therapy in Denver

One of the latest trends in airport stress-relief is to bring in certified therapy dogs for the guests to pet and play with in the terminal. This is not exclusive to Denver airport, as I found many articles where airports around America had brought in special dogs to soothe customers. This usually happens during the busy holiday season, where travel seems very high-stakes and travelers just want to hurry past to visit family. Many passengers who visited with the dogs reported that their stress levels had decreased by a substantial amount and they were very glad to play with a pooch during their stressful trip.

4. Butterfly Garden in Singapore

You read that right! The Changi airport in Singapore boasts a very luscious garden in Terminal 3 that houses more than 1,000 tropical butterflies and as many as 40 species during different seasons of the year. This unique space of tranquility is open to passengers who are traveling through their airport at no cost. The natural light, water features, and beautiful nature on display in this garden help passengers feel an instant sense of relaxation.

Airports are focusing more every year on making the passenger experience less stressful and more luxurious. I hope that in your future travels you are able to find a peaceful release from all of the stress!

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Airlines | Tori Williams



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