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Thoughts From The National Waco Club Reunion Fly-in

by Tori Williams 2. July 2017 12:30
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Last weekend I had the opportunity to attend an aviation event that truly inspired me. The 58th annual National Waco Club Reunion was held at Wynkoop Airfield in Mount Vernon, Ohio. My husband and his father have flown into this particular fly-in for several years. This was my first year being able to join them, and I am so glad that I did.

Our trip to Wynkoop was a little over 200 nautical miles. We arrived Thursday evening and did our best to prepare for the incoming thunderstorms on Friday. The rain definitely hit full force and pilots were grounded for the majority of the day. Thankfully all was not lost, and the skies opened up to beautiful sun and favorable winds on Saturday. It was the perfect weather and a great backdrop to the 22 unique Waco aircraft that flew in.

There were several factors that made this fly-in so special. First, the majority of the Waco aircraft flown in are project planes that have been meticulously restored from the ground up. The passionate aviators who have dedicated thousands of hours to their planes aim to honor historical accuracy. These are friends that go back decades and have watched the progress of each other’s projects over time. They call it a reunion for a reason!

Second, the pilots at this fly-in wanted to do just that – fly! At any point in the day there would be several beautiful biplanes whirling around the field, doing low passes, and occasionally taking the lucky passenger for a ride. I like this aspect better than events like AirVenture because you are able to go up whenever you’d like, whereas it can be difficult to get into the air at AirVenture if you aren’t in an airshow.

The third special thing about the National Waco Club Reunion is the locals who come out to see the planes. They are always respectful and curious about general aviation. Unlike some fly-ins where the public seems to come just for the entertainment value, these people have a much deeper passion and respect for the work that goes into restoring and maintaining these aircraft.

An important part of every fly-in is the food that is available. There was a hearty breakfast served Saturday as pilots prepared for the day ahead. In the afternoon attendees enjoyed brats, burgers, and hotdogs with all of the fixings. Another great option was the homemade ice cream food truck parked outside the FBO. The Saturday night banquet was especially delicious and the catered buffet was served on the field!

The fly-in is not heavily publicized in the area. Locals just know that near the end of June the biplanes will come in, and they will show up after they see them flying around town. I had a good experience with every single person that I interacted with from the town of Mount Vernon. They were enthusiastic about the airplanes and we had several of them thank us for coming to town.

My husband especially enjoyed taking the locals up for rides during the fly-in. He said it’s important to him to show people that aviation is a lot more than a way to get from point A to point B. General aviation is more than a hobby, but rather a lifestyle for many. The more that the general public knows about it, the more they will be willing to support pilots and airports in legal matters they may have a voice in. Giving a face to general aviation and the people who enjoy it is an important mission for both of us.

Overall this fly-in was a great experience and I highly recommend attending in the future. The enthusiasm and zeal for aviation shared by the pilots is very clear as soon as you step onto the field. This fly-in truly serves as a great example of success for all other types of aviation events.

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Flying | Tori Williams | Vintage Aircraft

Top 5 Reasons YOU Should go to EAA AirVenture This Year

by Tori Williams 2. June 2017 16:21
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I am excited to report that we are officially less than two months away from the start of EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2017! Dubbed “The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration,” AirVenture is hosted annually by the Experimental Aircraft Association near the end of July in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. This year the dates run from July 24th -30th. I have been lucky to be able to attend Oshkosh three times before, including flying in twice.

One thing that has surprised me while studying aviation in college is that very few of my classmates have gone to AirVenture. A few of them had not even heard of it before! I am here to tell you about how AirVenture is a must-do for any aviation enthusiast, and how it can be affordable and fun for anyone – including college students!

(Note for the pilots: Maybe you have been going to Oshkosh for years, but have never tried to fly in. This year you should consider pushing yourself and flying in! It may seem overwhelming at first but the tower and ground personnel are extremely skilled at helping first-timers during their entrance. Read up on the NOTAM and imagine the sense of accomplishment you will when you can proudly say you flew into AirVenture!)

Without further ado, here are my top five reasons you should visit Oshkosh this year.

1. It’s Affordable

One of the biggest reasons my college friends haven’t been to AirVenture is because they think that it is not affordable. Let me tell you, EAA has thought about that. They want as many people as possible to experience the week so they have made ways for even the most frugal people to come. Although the cost of admission and camping out usually add up to less than the cost of one Spring Break trip, EAA also has a whole host of opportunities for visitors to volunteer during the week and get free admission, meals, and even accommodations.

2. It’s a Great Learning Experience

A good aviator never stops learning, and there are thousands of ways you can learn new things while at Oshkosh. Head over to the forums to learn about everything from TIG welding to the complete history of a specific aircraft. Additionally, there are over 800 exhibitors to visit and learn about. The cutting edge of technology is always on display at AirVenture, and attendees will be able to see things they never would have otherwise.

3. It’s Great for Networking

Whether you are a business owner, a college student, a professional pilot, or anything in between, there is going to be someone at AirVenture that you need to meet and talk to. I have made lasting friendships with people I have camped beside, and I have made professional connections with vendors that I can use throughout my whole career. The best part is: you don’t even realize you’re networking! You are all just there to have fun and enjoy the week. It never feels forced or awkward, as some networking events can tend to be.

4.It’s Unlike any Other Event

An “air show” by the classic definition would include unique airplanes doing stunts and wowing the crowd. However, AirVenture is so much more than just an air show. They call it an aviation celebration because there is no better way to describe all that happens. You are able to pick and choose from hundreds of ways to spend your time. If you want a relaxed day at the museum, take a free tram over there and spend the day indoors. If you want an unforgettable airplane ride in a B-17 or Ford Tri-Motor, go ahead and do it! There’s international food, games, and so many ways to customize the week to your desires.

5. It’s FUN

Starting with the opening night concert featuring Barenaked Ladies, AirVenture is determined to have every single attendee have a great time. Air shows featured throughout the day will amaze even the most experienced pilot. At night, the Fly-In Theater is scheduled to play several popular movies, including Sully and Rogue One. Although it can be exhausting trying to see everything you want in one day, it is worth every second and you will leave with unforgettable memories.

What is your favorite part of Oshkosh? Are you attending this year? Let me know in the comments below!

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Flying | Tori Williams | Vintage Aircraft

High-Wing Vs. Low-Wing Aircraft

by Tori Williams 3. May 2017 17:28
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One of the first things an aspiring pilot learns is that not all aircraft are created equal. At least, not in the eyes of other pilots. It doesn’t take very many conversations with a pilot to find out exactly what type of aircraft they love and hate. Some pilots have good reasons for preferring one type over another, while others just have a soft spot for a certain type they trained in or became infatuated with.

The disagreements cover a variety of aircraft types. Tailwheel verses nose gear, retractable versus fixed gear, G1000 versus the historic six-pack. Each of these has been debated between pilots for years and I’m sure they will continue to be debated. Another popular category is high-wing verses low-wing aircraft. I personally have a preference for high-wing, as the vast majority of my flight time has been in Cessna 172s and a Stinson 10A.

I was curious what the general consensus was on where the best location for the wings is, so I took to the Internet and… Found no clear answer. It seems that there are pros and cons to both configurations, and it almost always boiled down to preference over hard facts. I have compiled a few major things to consider if you are in the scenario where you must choose between a high-wing or low-wing aircraft.

Visibility

Visibility was one of the first things pilots commented on when debating between the two. High-wing aircraft simply give pilot and passengers a better view of the sky around them and ground below them. They are ideal for an introduction flight, cruising around for fun, or flying on missions that require a clear view of the ground. Low-wing aircraft offer outstanding views of the world above the cockpit, but the wings can block anything below.

Accessibility

When fueling on the ground, it is usually much easier to access the tanks on a low-wing aircraft. Most high-wing fuel tanks require standing on a ladder to reach. However, the flip side of this is that it is more difficult to reach the fuel drains and visually inspect the underside of the wing on a low-wing aircraft.

Ground Clearance

Pilots of low-wing aircraft have to be more conscientious of any obstacles on the ground. This includes taxiway lights, tie-downs, and airport signage. The high-wing pilot still has to watch out, but has the ease of knowing their wings are not in such close proximity.

Safety

In the event of an emergency landing, low-wing aircraft have the advantage of being able to absorb some of the crash impact in the wings instead of the fuselage. They also help in the event of a water landing, having the potential to float above the water for a short period of time.

Some pilots love having shade under their wings on a hot summer day. Other pilots prefer being able to set maps or logbooks on the wing during preflight. Some pilots hate having to walk on the wing to get into the aircraft.

At the end of the day, there is no clear winner. It seems that it mostly comes down to personal preference and familiarity with the type of aircraft. Do you prefer high-wing or low-wing? What do you think makes one better than the other? Let me know in the comments below!

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Aircraft Sales | Aviation Safety | Flying | Tori Williams

Gulfstream Becomes a Business Aviation Icon

by Tori Williams 17. March 2017 16:14
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There’s no doubt that Gulfstream Aerospace has been getting a lot of attention lately. They debuted their brand new G500 model at NBAA last year, as well as continued to break world records for speed in their G650ER model. The attention is well earned, as they are quickly becoming one of the biggest icons in business aviation.

Gulfstream has had their focus on luxurious business aviation aircraft since the beginning. The company began in the late 1950s when Grumman Aircraft Engineering Co., known for their military aircraft production, developed their first business aircraft at the end of World War II. Grumman decided to split their military and civilian aircraft production to increase efficiency. The civilian branch moved to Savannah, Georgia and eventually came to be known as Gulfstream Aerospace. http://www.gulfstream.com/company/history

Their history is full of record-setting firsts in business aviation, beginning with the GII model, which became the first business jet to cross the Atlantic Ocean nonstop in 1968. Their innovation and pursuit of perfection continued as they developed and produced more business jet models, including the GIV featuring civil aviation’s first digital flight-management computers in the cockpit.

According to new market research, the global business-jet market was valued at $20.9 billion in 2013 and is expected to reach $33.8 billion by the end of 2020. http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/PressReleases/business-jet.asp With endless possibilities for innovation on the horizon, the market is sure to hold strong for many years to come. Companies like Beechcraft and Cessna provide steep competition, but Gulfstream has been able to continually stay ahead of the curb and produce quality, desirable aircraft.

It is very likely they will continue their reign as an icon in the business jet world for years to come. The diversity of their fleet, the wonderful craftsmanship of their designs, and the innovation of their technologies are all factors that critics rave about with each new model. Gulfstream truly has a bright future, and an enormously impressive past.

For the current market and trends see https://www.globalair.com/aircraft-for-sale/Private-Jet/Gulfstream-Aerospace

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Tori Williams

The Best Free Online Aviation Resources

by Tori Williams 1. February 2017 20:30
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It’s no secret, being a pilot is expensive. Especially during the initial training phase where you have to worry about plane rental, fuel costs, paying your instructor, purchasing study materials, paying for written exams and checkride fees. That doesn’t even include the hundreds of dollars you spend on a headset, kneeboard, charts, foggles, and any other required materials for beginning your piloting career or hobby.

While it is worth spending a little extra money for quality flight training, there are also plenty of free resources available for student pilots to take advantage of. I’ve compiled a list of my favorite completely free aviation resources for you to check out and hopefully benefit from! Do you have a favorite free resource? Let me know in the comments below!

1. FAA FAR AIM

As any good student pilot knows, the Federal Aviation Regulations are everything. Love them or hate them, you’re going to have to know and understand a good chunk of them for your checkride. Luckily for you, these regulations are publically available for free on the FAA Website. This might not be the most exciting news, but it is handy for quick reference if you don’t have a physical copy on hand.

2. Podcasts

I was surprised by the amount of times I heard my fellow pilots talking about aviation podcasts that they listened to while I was at my flight university. As it turns out, there are quite a few great quality podcasts out there for new and seasoned pilots alike. A few of my favorites are The Finer Points, Coffee Break Flight Instruction, and Airplane Geeks. There are tons more out there with topics ranging from flight instruction to military aircraft to aviation current events. A quick Google search can bring up dozens!

3. AOPA Student Resources

An AOPA membership is known for being a great resource to the world of aviation, but they also have several free resources available without a membership. Student pilots have access to tons of articles, event calendars, and flight planning tools right at their fingertips. To sweeten the deal, AOPA is offering 6 months of free membership to student pilots, including 6 monthly issues of their Flight Training Magazine. That’s an offer you can’t refuse!

4. Pilots of YouTube

For someone like me who is an extremely visual learner, YouTube has been a lifesaver. A quick search on YouTube for “flight training” resulted in 5,180,000 videos. Of course, not all of these are going to be winners. However, there are several that have a great way of explaining private and instrument pilot techniques and information. I highly recommend poking around to see what has been created, or searching for the specific problem you are stuck on.

5. GlobalAir.com

Did you know that the very site you are on right now has several wonderful (and completely free!) aviation resources? Our Aviation Directory is a great source to find links to all things in the flying world. Check out the “Airport Resource” tab to look up detailed information about any airport, or to check the fuel prices at thousands of airports around the nation. There is so much you can learn from the information listed on GlobalAir.com. Go ahead and check it out!

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Aviation Safety | Flying | Tori Williams



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