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3 Ways to Study More Effectively

by Lydia Wiff 15. April 2017 09:00
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It’s that time of year again!  Yes, Finals are just around the corner and this is when life get exceptionally busy for college students.  We’re all busy finishing up last projects, presentations, papers, and preparing for our last round of exams plus our Final exams (yes, some professors give two tests back to back).  The great thing about college and higher education, you learn several ways to study.  I’ll cover three ways you can study more effectively and hopefully it will save you some effort whether you’re taking a final exam or studying for your next checkride.

#3: Do Less & Not More

Now, I know this seems a little backwards, but cramming more material versus being strategic about your study time has been shown to be more productive.  In a study done by the University of California – Las Angeles (UCLA), cramming for a test or burning through a pile of homework was less beneficial than getting the extra sleep and picking up again in the morning. 

The pattern of cramming more homework in a few hours at night is often derived from habits in high school when most students are at school for hours a day only to come home to that many more hours of homework.  In addition to these habits, colleges often suggest two to three hours of studying for every one credit hour.  For the average student, taking the average full-time load of 12 credits, this is at least 24 hours of study per week.

Now, add the “recommended” 24 hours of studying, if you’re only taking 12 credits, and add your part time job (or jobs).  Most students are taking above the full-time limit to either finish programs on time, or just to quality for scholarships and financial aid.  Pretty soon, your “recommended” study time creeps well above 30 hours, not to mention your work schedule.

You end up being stuck with a few hours at night to accomplish everything you need to and you end up at the point of diminishing returns – less sleep, a propensity to become sick, and reduced attention spans.  This is where it is important to come to grips with the fact that sometimes doing less is actually more.

#2: What Worked Once Won’t Always Work Twice

A few years ago, I remember an individual asking me how I studied for my classes – I think they wondered if my study methods directly correlated to how well I did in class.  Moreover, it seems a common misconception is that a student uses exactly the same method for every class – this is far from the truth. 

We learn many study methods over the course of high school as well as college.  However, I have found what works in one class does not work in others.  For instance, if you’re taking a class that is full of facts and numbers, such as a science class, you may find yourself using a lot of flash cards to memorize terms and definitions.  On the other hand, you may find yourself in a class that requires understanding concepts, and not just recognizing terms.  You will probably have to understand the context behind a definition and connect that to a real-world example.  This does not even account for the fact that no two professors teach or write tests and assignments the same.  For these reasons, I find myself adapting in almost every class when implementing my studying strategy. 

                                              

For instance, I am currently in a class that prepares me for a certification exam in airport operations and administration.  The study material is almost entirely context-based, meaning I need to understand what something does rather than just memorize a term or a name.  I probably won’t get asked to select the correct year for a piece of important aviation legislation, but I’ll be given the name and date of that act and asked what it accomplished for the airport industry. 

So, it’s important to get a feel first for how the professor teaches and what they test on and then adjust your techniques accordingly.

#1: Take a Break

I saved this tip for last because I think it’s the most underappreciated tip out there.  We all think “of course I take breaks!”  However, those breaks are probably after we’ve done an all-night study session and we want to grab a few hours of sleep before our big comprehensive final.  The most important piece of advice I got while in community college was to do intense periods of studying (30 minutes max) followed by 10 minutes of break.

This break could be on social media, listening to music, or some other relaxing activity such as walking.  The point is that you concentrate on studying with no distractions for a certain period of time followed by a real break.

Similar publications and articles suggest between 30 and 50 minutes of concentrated studying along with five to ten minutes of a break.  The goal is to get quality study time in which you actually retain knowledge versus pulling an all-night session and not being able to retain even half of the information.

Happy Studying!

Honestly, few people actually enjoy spending hours studying, but hopefully you have a few new ideas how to study more effectively.

Remember:

·       Study less, not more;

·       Be strategic in your methods;

·       And, take a break!

For all of you out there in the final throes of the semester (like me), keep up the good work and study smarter, not harder!

Image courtesy of Google.com.

 

 

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Lydia Wiff | UND

3 Ways to Dust Off Your Logbook

by Lydia Wiff 31. March 2017 07:00
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Spring is here!  It’s hard to believe I was just writing about winter weather flying and now spring has officially sprung (as of nine days ago).  For many of you, you might be tied to the weather during the winter when it comes to flying.  This could be due to the ratings you hold, the airport you hanger at, or even the equipment your aircraft is equipped with.  Whatever your reason may be, the arrival of spring means the return of better flying days!  So, today I will share a few ways to dust off your logbook.

#3: Get Current

I know, it’s probably the old standby for when we want to fly, but have no idea where to fly to.  Spring is the perfect time to sneak in an early morning flight to get day current.  So, that means that every 90 days, you need to get out there and do three take-offs and landings, full-stop, to carry passengers.  This could easily take up an hour of flying and it gets you back into the pattern at your home airport, or maybe a nearby airport.

Likewise, you should get night current while you are at it.  Although, darkness comes a lot later these days, so plan accordingly.  Another great way to get current, as an Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) rated pilot, is to get instrument current.  Every six calendar months, you will need to log at least six instrument approaches, holding procedures, including intercepting and tracking courses using a navigation system.

While you probably should not wait every 90 days to practice landings, or every six months to do instrument work, it does happen.  If it has been awhile, be sure to take up a current pilot with you as a safety pilot, or better yet: find an instructor!  Getting current is a great way to ease back into fair-weather flying.

#2: Do Your Flight Review

What once used to be called the Biennial Flight Review, now is just shortened to Flight Review (FR).  This requires a pilot holding any certificate to go through a review flight with a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) every 24 calendar months.

I would describe the FR as an abbreviated check ride.  You go through many of the same topics in a checkride, but it is much shorter.  You might remember reading about my interview with Woody Minar, a seasoned Designated Pilot Examiner.  In that interview, he gives some good tips in preparing for your upcoming FR.  If you want some additional tips from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), check out this link to their FR guide.

Lastly, did you know that safety seminars through the FAA Safety Team (FAAST) can give you credit towards an FR?  Through attending seminars in various topics around or at your home airport and a little extra flying with an instructor, you can get credit for an FR.  I’ve done this once before and made it through the Basic Level – you get to learn a lot, fly a little, and get a cool pin to wear.  Furthermore, the goal of working through all the levels is a good way to push yourself to keep up with your weekend flying (or whenever you can work it in).

#1: Fly for Fun!

I realize that all of us can’t afford to rent an aircraft all the time.  Sometimes the harsh reality of the bank account is enough to keep even the most passionate pilot from flying on a sunny spring day.  For this reason, I encourage all you pilots to find a flying buddy.

Finding a fellow pilot to fly with is great for several reasons: you have someone to talk to, you can both brush up on your skills, and (most importantly) you can split the costs!  Not only do you need to find a fellow pilot to fly with, but you need to find somewhere fun to fly to – this could be a lake place, a golf course, a friend’s private airport, a museum, and more.  The possibilities are endless and they give you a purpose for flying. 

Enroute to fun destinations is a great time to practice slow flight, stalls, Commercial maneuvers, landings at other airports, dead reckoning, instrument approaches, going under the hood, or simply building cross-country time.  You really can’t go wrong when your fun flying has a learning purpose.

Happy Flying!

Hopefully you have some ideas now on how to take advantage of the better weather and dust off your logbook.  I’m hoping to get some flying in myself in a few weeks when I get back home for Easter – by the way, did you realize that is just around the corner too???

Happy Spring Flying!

Images courtesy of Google.com

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Aircraft instruments, IFR, IMC, safety | Flying | GlobalAir.com | Lydia Wiff | UND

Tales from the Red River Valley

by Lydia Wiff 15. March 2017 08:00
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At UND Aerospace, the sense of community and family is strong among the current students and faculty, but even more so among the alumni.  My first opportunity to connect with my interviewee was through my work with the UND Air Race Classic Team when Mr. Leppke sent me a brief message relating his time in the UND Flying Club which preceded the School of Aerospace Sciences.  I have been wanting to share Mr. Leppke’s story for some time, and I was excited when he and I could exchange emails and read his tales from the Red River Valley. 

Bob Leppke, a UND alumnus, studied in John Odegard’s first aviation class.  Retired, he lives in Seattle where he enjoys his grandkids and the area’s aviation culture. 

Lydia Wiff (LW): Tell me how you ended up at UND.

Bob Leppke (BL): I grew up on a farm southwest of Carrington, North Dakota.  Prior to UND, my education included 8 years in a one room school house close to our family farm and 4 years at the Carrington High School.  In high school, I became interested in business.  Through my older brother, a UND graduate, I became familiar with the university. Because of the strong reputation of the College of Business, I decided to attend UND. 

LW: Tell me about your degree program at UND and how you got involved in the Flying Club (precursor to UND Aerospace).

BL: I selected the Business Administration BS/BA degree program in the College of Business.  I enjoyed the business curriculum especially, the courses on management.   The four years went by quickly.   Not only did I gain an education, I gained a wife two years into my college career.

In the spring of my senior year, I needed an elective to fill out the semester. I wanted something different, so I ended up enrolling in the Introduction to Aviation course.  I did not have any aviation experience but always loved airplanes. As a kid, I loved to build model airplanes and watch a neighbor fly his Piper Cub over our farm. 

It was the first time the course was offered at UND.  The class included 11 other students and was held in one of the basement rooms in the UND Law building.  I can still remember the first day.    John Odegard, our instructor gave us a summary of what he would cover and what materials we would need.  The goal of the class was to prepare students for the FAA private pilot written exam.  I did not know where it would lead, but I was thrilled with the course material and was especially impressed with John Odegard’s instruction.  I studied harder for this class than the business-related classes and it paid dividends because I ended up with an “A” and passed the FAA exam.  

Since I had to stay in Grand Forks for the summer, I talked to John about flight lessons.  I was concerned whether I would have time to complete the requirements for the PPL before I needed to leave Grand Forks for the military.  The Vietnam War was in progress and I ended up being drafted after graduation.  John laid out a schedule that convinced me I could complete the training in time.  I joined the UND Flying Club and scheduled lessons with one of the club instructors.  There is no doubt that John’s enthusiasm had rubbed off.  I could not wait to get started.  At that time the club had a Cessna 150, Piper Cherokee 180 and a Mooney.   

LW: Tell me about your flight instructors.

BL: My first flight instructor was Ann Ross Anderson. I met her at the UND Flying Club hanger and she took me on my first flight using the Flying Club’s 1967 Cessna 150 (6232S).    John Odegard’s course had already planted the desire to fly, but after the first flight, I was really hooked.  I reached around 10 hours of dual instruction when Ann told me she accepted a job with the FAA in Grand Rapids, MI and was leaving Grand Forks. During my time with Ann, I learned that she served our country during WWII as a member of the WASP’s (WWII   1942-1944 Women’s Auxiliary Service Pilots).  She was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2009.  I was ready for my first solo but Ann felt it would be best to get started with another instructor before I soloed. 

My second flight instructor was Col. Lincoln L. White.  He was serving in the US Air Force at the Grand Forks Airbase as a B-52 navigator.  He told me many stories about his love for flying and his time in the military. Because of his military background, he expected perfection in my flying, navigation and knowledge of the airplane.  I looked forward to each lesson with him.   Thankfully, he was able to stay in Grand Forks until I was ready for the PPL check ride. 

Five days before I was scheduled to begin my US Army training at FT Lewis, WA, Col. White gave me my last review and scheduled me for the PPL check ride with Elton Lee Barnum.  After an hour and half in the air, Mr. Barnum shook my hand and said I passed.  I was thrilled and could not wait to tell my wife who was waiting in the Club hanger.   I took my wife for a short flight and then called John Odegard to thank him for all the instruction and encouragement.   I could not think of a better way to cap off my time at UND.  That night we left Grand Forks. I did not know at the time that two years later I would be back. 

LW: Tell me about your experience interacting with John Odegard.

BL: During the spring semester Introduction to Aviation class, my contact with John was primarily in the classroom.  But something was different.   His passion for aviation was rubbing off.  He made learning fun and brought a high level of enthusiasm to the class.  

After I found out that I had passed the FAA written exam, I went to his office to talk to him.  He congratulated me and asked me questions about the exam.  During the discussion, he expressed a disappointment that a number of students had failed the exam.  He told me that he felt he had not included some topics in his instruction.  He did not blame the students.  It was after I completed the course that I started to have more contact with John. His help in getting me started on flight lessons was greatly appreciated.  The relationship changed from instructor to mentor.    

During my second year in the Army, I found out that I could get discharged two months early if I went back to college.  The timing was excellent because I could leave the Army with just enough time to start a fall semester.  I had been in contact with John Odegard during my time in the Army and learned that he was able to implement curriculum for a full aviation administration major within the School of Business.  After some back and forth mail and encouragement from John I decided to return to UND. 

I left Ft Lewis, Washington August 15th, my last day in the Army and returned to Grand Forks.   It was great to see the expansion of the aviation program.  John had also managed to obtain two new Cessna 150’s. I enrolled in 24 semester hours of junior and senior-level aviation courses over the 70-71 school year.  The classes included Advanced Aeronautics, Air Transportation, Airline Operations, Airport Management, Advanced Instrument, Intro to Air Traffic Control, and Aerospace Law.  I also enrolled in one Advanced Aero Lab and flew 44 hours toward a commercial license.  Classes were held in the rooms on the first floor of Gamble Hall.   John’s office was located next to the classrooms. 

It was like coming back home.   I ended up have both John Odegard and Mr. Barnum for instructors.  John taught the airport management class.   I remember two projects that I worked on, one was picking an airport and writing a paper about it.  I picked the new Houston International Airport in TX.  I also built a model of one of the terminal buildings.  The second study was on airport snow removal.   One milestone during the class was John taking us on a tour of the Winnipeg Airport in the UND DC 3.  (No Passports, customs.  Can you imagine what it would take today) It was my first and only ride in a DC3.   Mr.  Barnum taught the Advanced Instrument course.  There were new instructors teaching the other courses.   One instructor would fly to Grand Forks from North Central Airlines in Minneapolis.   He would later open the door for me to interview with North Central Airlines.

Things had changed at the airport.  UND had a small trailer used as a pilot lounge on the west side of the large Quonset hanger. The airport was now controlled by a tower.   The Cessna 150s were tied up outside the Quonset. The DC 3 was parked inside the Quonset.  They also had a maintenance shop in the Quonset and had one mechanic on staff.

As I was getting close to the end of the 1971 spring semester I started looking for a job in aviation.  John helped by creating a booklet with information about those of us that were completing the major.   He also helped arrange an interview at Republic Airline in Minneapolis.   

Through the years I have always been grateful for John’s impact on my life during those years at UND.   John’s approach to learning and pursuit of excellence was a major help during my career in software engineering and IT.   The fact that John is the only classroom instructor that I remember from my college days tells a lot. 

LW: Where did you end up after graduation and where are you at today?

BL: After adding the Aviation Administration major to my degree I left Grand Forks to look for a position in Airline management.  It was bad timing because the airline industry was in one of its deepest recessions.   I needed work so I fell back on my business major and ended up with an IT management position in Chicago.   I stayed in Chicago for 10 years and then moved to Boston where I managed a software engineering group. After 14 years in Boston I moved to Seattle to work as an IT Project Management Professional until I retired in 2010.

LW: What are some important lessons you learned at UND?

BL: One of the lessons I learned while at UND was to set goals and be persistent in pursuing the goals.  It is interesting that after all the business courses it was the aviation training that added the most valuable aspects in pursuing a successful career.  Being a pilot there is structure and discipline that you learn that is so important in life.   It also is a great confidence builder.   Every time I was faced with something difficult in my career, I would think back to my aviation days at UND.

LW: What have been some of your networking experiences with UND alumni? 

BL: In my business travels, I started to run into aviation graduates and loved to share those early days of aviation at UND with them.  I have enjoyed the Alumni get-together in Seattle where I have met a number of UND aviation graduates.  Through my 40 year career in IT and Software Engineering, I told countless people about the program.  My co-workers in Chicago, Boston, and Seattle all heard about UND Aviation.  If I ran into anyone looking for a career in aviation, I always directed them to UND.

I noticed as the years went by that more people, especially those connected to aviation, knew about the aviation program at UND.   In 2010 I got to know the CEO of Alaska Airlines.   He talked about hiring from UND.   I also have found out that some of the graduates from the air traffic control program are now working in Seattle.

LW What is your advice to UND students and recent graduates?

BL: Do not be afraid to take risks.  Try new things.   All your experiences are building blocks in your career path.  With hard work, you will find success in all that you do.

LW: What’s one thing you’ll always take away from UND?

BL: I have always been proud to have my degree from a university in my home state.  It was a solid stepping stone to start a career.  The aviation training was a plus in that it gave me confidence that I could do new things.  I accomplished more than I could have imagined than when I started college at UND.  Most of this I owe to the aviation training and my relationship with John Odegard.

I have always enjoyed the statement from Leonardo da Vinci.  I have displayed it in my offices over the past 45 years.  Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.”   Leonardo da Vinci

 

 Image courtesy of Bob Leppke.

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Aviation History | GlobalAir.com | Lydia Wiff | UND

Job Hunting 101

by Lydia Wiff 1. January 2017 08:00
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As a new year has just begun, some of our readers might be considering a new job or a career change.  I’ve been in the process of job searching and applying as my graduation date is just around the corner and naturally I’ve been thinking about the subject a lot.  This week’s post will focus on some tips on preparing your application and for an interview.

The Application

I recently went through the University of North Dakota’s (UND) Aviation Capstone as part of finishing up my Bachelor studies and we had a few weeks of class activities surrounding the idea of career preparation.  A professor I had in class on several occasions came in as a guest lecturer and spends time outside of his classes as a counselor to individuals who are searching and applying for jobs.

One of the things he stressed the most was making sure that an application was completely filled out when applying.  Leaving blank areas can invite more questions than necessary, but could possibly put a person’s application at the bottom of the stack.  Potential employers need to know you can follow through on a task, so an application is a good place to see if you can read directions and completely fill out a form.  In the aerospace field, you’ll have to do a lot of paperwork and forms, so an application is a good place to start when evaluating a potential job candidate.

Another point he made was to be as thorough as possible when providing information.  For instance, in the airport industry you often have to go through a background check that can go back as far as five to ten years.  While this is a painstaking process, providing as much information as possible makes the process go much smoother than leaving out key details.  It can also raise some potential red flags to a future employer if they see large gaps during those time periods.

Lastly, it’s important to be entirely truthful in your responses to application questions.  This may seem like a no-brainer, but it could mean the difference from not being considered all together or getting a lot of extra questions in the interview process. 

Resume and Cover Letter

I’ve always thought of the resume and cover letter as the most important part of an application.  This is mostly because a resume provides a snapshot of work history, education, skills, etc., while a cover letter gives a snapshot of why a company should consider you as a candidate.  For those reasons, it becomes crucial piece of preparation for any possible job and should be periodically review to make sure information is up-to-date.

The resume is generally kept to one page.  Some professionals with many years of experience will often have two, or even three, pages for their resume while academic professionals, such as professors, will have a curriculum vitae (commonly known as a CV) as their resume.  It’s used most in the academic world, but contains greater detail than your average resume.  College graduates will often use a traditional resume style unless going into an academic position or some related type of job.

Important items to include are your personal information such as mailing address, email and phone number as well as your name.  The actual layout depends on your personal preference and generally includes the following items: an objective, educational degrees (who, what, where, and when), Grade Point Average (GPA), work history, as well as certifications held and personal interests or professional affiliations.

On my resume I have a section for my professional objective, Associate degree, Bachelor degree (clearly noted as in progress), honors level (if obtained), GPA, and then that section is followed by certifications I hold.  Currently, I have my Private Pilot’s License (PPL) for Airplane Single Engine Land (ASEL) as well as my High Performance Endorsement.  Eventually I plan to add certifications as I continue my training in airport operations and management.

The next section I have is work or related experience with jobs I have held in the last few years, particularly those I have held while at UND and in the Airport Management program.  The challenging thing about being limited to one page is that I may not be able to fit all of the jobs held prior to a certain date, however, those jobs are still related to my program.  While I may not be able to add it to my resume, it’s certainly something that can be worked into an interview when they ask about your previous experience.

Lastly, I have a section for my professional affiliations.  This section is sometimes used for hobbies and personal interests and give an idea of what a potential candidate does outside their normal workday.  For instance, for several years I was involved in the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), the US Air Force Auxiliary, so I list that on my resume as it was a significant period of time I spent in volunteer service.  However, I am inactive in CAP as of right now, so I am careful to delineate dates that I was actively serving in the program.  Oftentimes, applications will an applicant to list any volunteer service organizations, so I will use CAP if I come across such a question.

Lastly, cover letters should also be kept to one page and should be neat and to the point.  A good place to start is to write about your intentions (applying for “X” job) and a summary of your work experience.  It should also use key words that might have been in the job description and any pertinent information you may want to call their attention to.  An employer may spend 5 minutes or less on your entire application, so make it clean and to the point, but with a personal touch.  Addressing the specific person or organization in the header of the letter and salutation is also a nice touch.   As with the resume, I generally use a template I’ve created, but I also make sure to review each application and tailor the cover letter to fit each one.

The Interview & Social Media

After you’ve finished the application process, you may be fortunate enough to get called in for an interview – this could involve a teleconference, a videoconference (common these days), or an in-person interview.  While a potential employer may have an idea of you on paper, you only get one shot at an in-person impression.

My professor at UND always stressed being professional in every way when it comes not only to your work, but an interview.  Preparing for your interview a few weeks ahead of time will help not only to reduce stress, but make sure you are on track.  Preparing answers to possible technical questions for your particular line of work, or field, as well as scenario questions (“Tell me about a time…”) are a good way to prepare and get your head in the game.

Additionally, preparing what you will wear is also important.  Suits are always a must and a black or navy blue with neutral or toned-down ties, accessories, etc. are a good start.  Making sure that your personal grooming is taken care of a head of time when it comes to getting a haircut, or shaving that winter beard off (this is important to males when they interview at airlines).  Additionally, going easy on the cologne or perfume, or forgoing it altogether can possibly prevent triggering your interviewer(s) allergies during the actual interview.  Of course, don’t forget to shower or use deodorant – this isn’t college!

Preparing ahead of time will can go a long way to feeling more comfortable in the interview setting.  As always, don’t get too comfortable – good stress is helpful in keeping you on your toes and focus.

Lastly, think long and hard about your social media use.  It’s more of an issue for my generation because of the ability to quickly access the internet from our phones, tables, etc.  A good rule of thumb is if your grandma would be shocked, then it’s probably something that shouldn’t be out there.  Also, comments about the work environment, coworkers, and bosses should be avoided, especially if in poor taste.  It doesn’t matter how private your settings are – someone, sooner or later, can find it.  I’m not saying social media is a no-no, I would just be careful what you put out there in general.

One other note: you might want to consider using professional sites such as LinkedIn which are often free and can be an extension of your traditional resume.  I’ve also used it to connect with those I’ve worked with or met in the industry and a way to network professionally.  I can also use it to keep track of special projects, events, etc., that I’ve been involved with over the last several years in addition to awards and certifications earned.  More and more, potential employers are using the internet to research candidates and LinkedIn is a positive way to present your past and present professional history.  I’ve also referenced it on more than one occasion when digging back into the last several years for job applications.

Wrapping It Up

Hopefully this article has been a good refresher on the job search process, but with some new twists on preparing an application.  While it’s an exciting time to be in the market looking for a job as an almost-graduate, it can also be an unnerving process.  Don’t hesitate to reach out to your college adviser, professor, or friends and family when preparing. 

 

Best wishes to all those in the job market!

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GlobalAir.com | Lydia Wiff | UND

Trade Show? I Think You Mean Fun Show!

by Lydia Wiff 1. November 2016 10:00
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Growing up, I always remember my dad attending trade shows for the different companies he worked for.  Now, he was an engineer, so I always assumed they were pretty boring (sorry, Dad!).  It didn’t matter if he came home with all the trade show cool swag like pens, pencils, reusable bags, hats, or stress balls (to a kid, those things are like gold).  Several years later, I have learned that trade shows, aviation ones of course, are tons of fun and the opportunities to network and learn are endless!  This post will cover a few that I have had the chance to personally attend as well.

Air Venture

What summer would be complete without a trip to Oshkosh, WI for the Experimental Aviation Association (EAA) Air Venture?  I know, people don’t really think of it as a trade show, but have you really looked around when you’ve been there?

Icon is giving demos of their recreational aircraft (you can fish from it!), Cirrus is writing up orders for their new jet, and general aviation is absolutely thriving during this aviation extravaganza.  Hundreds of companies tote their wares all week in the hope they will meet new customers, see their current customers, and really just get their name out there.  9am-5pm are the show hours, but networking goes on for hours after the show is closed.

Companies like Cirrus, Piper, Pilatus, Kodiak, and many other woo their customers and new clients with cookouts, dinners, and more.  New products get shown over dinner and deals get sealed by the time the dessert menu gets passed around.  Additionally, this “trade show” features class acts from aerobatics pilots, showcases military aircraft from every era of aviation, in addition to the biggest pyrotechnic show you’ll ever see at an airport (actually, it’s probably the only one at an airport). 

I love going to Oshkosh when I have the chance and even if you aren’t working with a company, it’s a great place to network.  Just sitting at lunch one day this summer, I met a pilot who flies for SkyWest – now, tell me that Air Venture isn’t the most fun you’ll ever have at a “trade show”. 

National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

The second trade show I’ve had the opportunity to attend is that of the NBAA Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition (BACE) in Las Vegas in November 2015.  This particular trade show caters to any type of business with a corporate flight department in the United Sates and all over the world. 

I had the opportunity to attend last fall with a group from the University of North Dakota (UND).  Since we were students attending, we got a huge break in the conference fee and by that I mean it was so affordable even for a poor, college student!  All we had to do was take care of meals, flights, and lodging.  I found some fellow students from Purdue University who were members of Women in Corporate Aviation which proved to be a great networking opportunity in and of itself. 

Additionally, there were many universities that had their own booths at BACE including any company you could possibly think of.  I actually sat on one of the shuttle buses with a gentleman from Italy who worked for Pilatus – I told you it was a worldwide affair!  I also had the chance to meet those from other companies at the different booths in addition to after-hours functions.  A fun memory was going to the Las Vegas Executive Airport and looking at all of the static aircraft displays.  Gulfstream had many different aircraft on display, which is one of my favorite business jet manufacturers.

Lastly, NBAA BACE was a great way to faces to names.  I actually got to meet the owners of Globalair.com and those that had given me the blogging scholarship that year.  If I wasn’t so busy with classes, I’d be back this year promoting the scholarship!

Why Trade Shows?

You’re probably sitting there wondering why you should go to trade shows in general.  Besides the FUN aspect of trade shows, it’s important to continue to network even though you might currently be a student, or even if you are well into your career.

Last year, I had a professor that really pushed students to attend NBAA and to network in general.  In fact, many of my professors, including my adviser, always push students to get their names out there.  It doesn’t matter if it’s introducing yourself to a guest lecturer, meeting alumni, or attending trade shows.  I guess what I’m getting at here is that you never know what’s around the corner and growing your professional network only builds your contact list in addition to the possible jobs that could arise from it. 

Plus, going to these events is a great way to catch up with alumi!  I love running into people I know at these events – it makes the event that much more memorable and we get to talk about aviation (I mean, who doesn’t?).


Remember, NBAA BACE is just around the corner!

November 1-3, 2016 – Orlando, FL

Visit the Globalair.com booth – Booth 4936!

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GlobalAir.com | Aircraft For Sale | Lydia Wiff | NBAA | UND



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