Look ahead or get left behind

Back in early 2007, the Blackberry was The Smart Phone. They had corporations and governments wrapped up and knew they were the dominant player in the smart phone market. If you asked them how they were doing on June 28, 2007, they would have been very optimistic. On June 29, 2007 the first iPhone was released. In 2014, Blackberry reportedly sold 7 million phones. Apple sold 74.5 million phones in the last quarter of 2014. So how are things looing ahead in your flight department?

Blackberry's parent, RIM, did not see nor did they understand what was happening with society and technology that lead to the original iPhone.  They never saw the warning signs. Today they are almost irrelevant in the mobile device market. The same can happen to any business. If you are a flight department, here are some of the danger signs that this problem is happening in your operation. 

• The business aircraft is used by only a few individuals within your organization.  

• The number of people using your service is decreasing.  

• The company (or your client's companies) are once again growing at a torrid pace, but your annual flight hours are onstant or increasing only slowly. 

If the company is doing better, why aren't you flying more? What is everyone else using for their air transportation needs?  

The elemental reason for each of these danger signs is the same - the service your organization provides is not as relevant to the needs of the potential users as it used to be. There are a number of possible reasons, including:

• The prices are perceived to be too high

• The capabilities of your operation do not meet the needs of the potential users

• Your operation does not have the technology needed by the potential users

• The potential new users do not know your service exists or think it is irrelevant to them

If you are only at the airport and not involved in the daily dealings and changes within your company, then you may be missing out on valuable information. If all you know is that you serve the big boss extremely well, what happens when there is a new big boss? 

There are three things to avoid being irrelevant. One is to get away from the airport and get downtown. The aviation operation is not the big boss' personal air taxi. It is a business asset. You need to understand your business's mission and how the flight department serves the corporate mission. You need to read the reports and sit in on meetings as appropriate. You need to walk around the halls of power and let folks know who you are and what the aviation team is all about.

The second thing is to find out what your current and potential users think or don't think about your service. It is quite easy to get people to tell you how they perceive your service, even busy people. Yes, think of the flight department as a business unit whose customers are in the corporation. Spend time with your current customers and users and listen to find out what they like about the service, what they don’t like and how they would like to see your organization improve. 

The third thing is to understand the future plans of the company. Then be proactive and plan ahead for the flight department so that you can be ahead of what the corporation needs. Don't assume that the current aircraft which does the job quite well will be effective next year, or five years. Where is the company changing? What are the growth opportunities? Or, is the company getting smaller and if so, how can you adjust? 

Just as corporations like RIM can miss out on what the future holds, so can the flight department miss out on what its future holds. Be proud of the quality service you provide, but seek to improve and always be on the lookout for new opportunities with your own company to further advance the company's mission.