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Key Missions & Evaluation Parameters

by David Wyndham 4. January 2018 13:05
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In the two previous issues, I introduced the Aircraft Acquisition Plan and your Acquisition Team. To be effective, your acquisition plan should consist of the following elements: - The organization's real aircraft needs. - Key missions and evaluation parameters. - Sources of information. - Technical analysis and ranking. - Fleet size. - Financial alternatives. - Financial analysis and ranking. - Tax Planning. This issue, I’ll focus on the first two items. 

“Mission drives requirements”

The foundation of the plan is to understand the mission assigned to the aviation function. Where does the aircraft add value to your company or owner? Yes, it makes better use of time. To what end? What is the importance of that time, and more over, the value of that time? Connecting the corporate goals and aspirations with the use of the aircraft enables you to define (and defend) the use of the aircraft as a valued business tool. Identify the most important mission for the aircraft as it relates to the achieving the corporations goals and vision. That is the mission which enables the aviation department to select the right aircraft by defining the parameters the aircraft must meet in order to help the corporation succeed. 

In defining the mission, we get to the importance of quantifying the mission. While a decision maker may select an aircraft from emotion, we need to make sure that they have the information needed to quantify their decision.  We need to quantify the mission, the aircraft requirements, and the costs. The decision maker can allow emotions in the process, as advisors, we cannot. Quantify every requirement to the greatest extent possible. 

Be proactive. If today’s mission is likely to change, focus your planning on what will come. While during times of rapid change, it is difficult to forecast, do it anyway. Ask the major users and decision makers for their inputs. Try to get a “probable” and a “best case” scenario. Or, if things are looking poorly, a “worst case” scenario.

Evaluation Parameters (Quantify!)

Evaluation parameters include cabin size, door size, cargo capacity, range, payload, etc. A key mission such as West Cost of the US to Asia could allow for a stop en route. If you can make it to Hawaii, every other over water leg can be made with less range.  The distance from the West Coast of the US to Hawaii is about 2,300 nautical miles (NM). Allowing for headwinds, you need at least 2,500 NM range to make it most of the time and 3,000 NM range to make it under almost any conditions. That Asia mission may require non-stop capability, but be aware of the available options.

Key missions allows you to define with the evaluation parameters needed to evaluate the possible aircraft. Identify aircraft that meet all the requirements and those that fall short in one or more areas. Include your current aircraft in this list as a baseline for judging other aircraft.  Once you have your aircraft criteria, it is usually good to list those in terms of “required” and “desired.” Required criteria are those which you must have to perform the key missions. Desired criteria are nice to have criteria that enhance the ability to perform the mission, but aren’t crucial to its success. 

If you don’t do your homework, you either end up with too much aircraft, or worse, end up with an aircraft that fails to do what was required. There is nothing worse than explaining to the boss why you can’t do the trip that was justification for the aircraft in the first place. Do this work up front and the rest of the analysis just falls into place. You’ll see. 

 

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