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Aviation News Rundown: A tribute to a local friend of the airport, plus news on the Boeing 787 and Cessna Citation

by GlobalAir.com 11. May 2010 10:26
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Longtime Bowman Field (LOU) airman Richard C. "Dick" Mulloy died Saturday. That is Mulloy above, in an image furnished by the Aero Club of Louisville, which published this about his life:

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Dick distinguished himself by playing in each of the post prestigious New Year’s Day Bowl games: The Sugar Bowl in 1940, the Rose Bowl in 1939 and the Orange Bowl in 1938, all for the University of Tennessee.

 

In addition to his football at Tennessee, he played football and baseball at St. Xavier High School in Kentucky, and was named All-State during his senior year. Once at Tennessee, he earned three letters in football and three in basketball. His 1940 football team was undefeated, untied and never scored on.

 

While at Tennessee he learned to fly, and in 1941, he entered the civilian pilot training program and later became a pilot instructor in the U. S. Army Primary Flying School. Later during World War II, he went to work for Chiang Kai-Shek under contract to the Chinese National Airlines flying “The Hump” across the Himalayas.

 

Following the war, Dick returned to Louisville and formed Kentucky Flying Service at Bowman Field. He built the organization over the years, operating out of the large hangar where they overhauled, maintained and sold aircraft.

 

In addition, Dick is credited with training more pilots than anyone else in this part of the country.

 

In 1987, he sold Kentucky Flying Service, and in 1992, he sold Helicopters, Inc., completing 47 years of operations at Bowman Field.

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In the news today, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week cites JP Morgan as saying the business jet market is "still in the doldrums," but recovery may only be a few quarters away. On the commercial side, the ax of poor economy continues to strike, as Reuters reports that Bahrain's state-owned Gulf Air has cut 500 jobs in the past six months.

On the positive side of commercial aviation, something that and can be seen as good news for Boeing's next generation of aircraft, the Gerson Lehrman Group notes that for every airliner cancelling a 787 order, another eager buyer is willing to take its place.

Finally, here are two industry announcements worth noting. Cessna introduced a program yesterday to reduce lead times for interior refurbishments on older Citations by stocking pre-selected, certified interior materials under a new program.

While the NBAA touted a resolution from the United States Senate that applauds general and business aviation for its efforts to provide relief to Haiti following the devastating earthquake in that nation early this year.

GA aircraft made more than 4,500 flights to Haiti during the first month following the disaster — when the airport and infrastructure were in shambles. At the same time, business aircraft performed more than 700 flights, transporting 3,500 passengers and delivering in excess of 1 million pounds of cargo and supplies.

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