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Vital Information regarding your FAA Registered Aircraft

by Jeremy Cox 4. August 2010 16:45
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I am writing to inform you of a new Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rule that establishes a ‘three-year life-limit’ for an Aircraft Registration. This means that starting in October of this year, you will be required to renew your aircraft registration every three years.  It is estimated that one third of the 357,000 aircraft registrations in the FAA’s database are inaccurate, therefore the FAA’s goal is to increase its accuracy to over 95%. This information is then going to be more useful to safety and security agencies throughout the U.S. government, and of course individual U.S. States, that will get a windfall from new-found State Tax Evaders.

 

To implement the rule, the FAA has established a schedule according to which Aircraft Registrations issued prior to October 1, 2010, will expire no later than December 31, 2013.  You should receive a notice in the mail from the FAA six months prior to the expiration of your current registration notifying you of when you should submit an application to re-register your airplane.  That notice will be sent to the address in the FAA database.  You may wish to verify that the address is correct by looking up your N# for free on Globalair.com here
 

If there are no changes required to your contact information, there will be an online process available to comply with the rule.  Unfortunately, the FAA has not made this online process available yet and it has not released the application form required to re-register your airplane.

 

I will monitor developments as the FAA’s new rule is implemented and I would of course be very happy to provide you with any additional information or assistance to comply with this rule.

 

Okay let’s review what this rule is actually all-about (sorry for repeating myself, but this is Vital Information regarding your FAA Registered Aircraft.)

 

My great friend, and colleague, Tim Keeney, wrote the following piece that explains this rule, very nicely indeed, and will be printed in the JetBrokers Market Up-Date Newsletter, which is in-work as you read this.. All credit for the brevity of this nice piece, goes to him:

 

All N#’s Set to Expire by December 31, 2013

 

Your aircraft Registration (your N#) will expire in the next three years; possibly as early as March 31, 2011.  The FAA has issued a final rule that will take effect on October 1, 2010, that requires you to renew your registration by December 31, 2013 and then re-register every three years thereafter.  The purpose of the rule is to maintain an accurate aircraft registry database; a goal not achieved by the Triennial Aircraft Registration Report.  The FAA estimates that one third of the 357,000 aircraft registrations currently on file are inaccurate.  The FAA uses the database for ownership determination and response to an overdue flight or downed aircraft report.  Law enforcement and other government agencies use the database for their own purposes.  The Federal Register’s summary of the rule mentions inclusion of registry information and status on a display depicting each flight operating on a flight plan in the National Airspace System.

 

So, how will you know when your registration expires, when to re-register your airplane and how to do it?  For aircraft registered before October 1, 2010, consult the following chart for your scheduled expiration:

 

If the certificate was issued in:                   The certificate expires on:               Application window:

March of any year                                      March 31, 2011                               11/1/2010 – 1/31/2011

April of any year                                         June 30, 2011                                   2/1/2011 – 4/30/2011

May of any year                                         September 30, 2011                         5/1/2011 – 7/31/2011

June of any year                                          December 31, 2011                          8/1/2011 – 10/31/2011

July of any year                                           March 31, 2012                                11/1/2011 – 1/31/2012

August of any year                                      June 30, 2012                                   2/1/2012 – 4/30/2012

September of any year                                September 30, 2012                        5/1/2012 – 7/31/2012

October of any year                                    December 31, 2012                          8/1/2012 – 10/31/2012

November of any year                                March 31, 2013                                11/1/2012 – 1/31/2013

December of any year                                 June 30, 2013                                    2/1/2013 – 4/30/2013

January of any year                                    September 30, 2013                          5/1/2013 – 7/31/2013

February of any year                                  December 31, 2013                           8/1/2013 – 10/31/2013

 

Aircraft registered after October 1, 2010, will have an expiration date on their registration document.   Also, the FAA will mail you an expiration reminder six months prior to your current registration’s expiration so it would behove you to check that the FAA has your correct address.  You may do this by looking up your N# for free on Globalair.com here
You must submit an application form (coming to the FAA.gov web site soon) during the proper filing window to ensure that your new registration arrives prior to the expiration of your current document which would result in your airplane being grounded.  Re-registrations that do not require changing information (i.e. names, addresses) may be completed online via a system not yet implemented.  The cost identified in the rule is $5.00 but there is concern among some groups that there is nothing to prevent the FAA increasing the renewal fee to raise revenue for the agency.  Finally, be advised that obtaining a replacement registration does not satisfy the requirement to re-register your airplane.

 

Tim Keeney, VP-Sales, JetBrokers, Inc.

tkeeney@jetbrokers.com

 

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Jeremy Cox



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